Benjamin Franklin's Printing Network: Disseminating Virtue in Early America

By Ralph Frasca | Go to book overview

1
The Art of Virtue and the Virtue of the Art

Upon his return to Philadelphia in 1785 after nine years of diplomatic service in France, Benjamin Franklin learned that a new state had been named for him. The fledgling state's Congressional delegate, William Cocke, informed Franklin that “as a testimony of the high esteem they have for the many important and faithful services you have rendered to your country,” the region's denizens “have called the name of their State after you.” Franklin responded, “It is a very great Honour indeed, that its Inhabitants have done me, and I should be happy if it were in my Power to show how sensible I am of it, by something more essential than my Wishes for their Prosperity.”1

During his lifetime and for every generation since, Franklin's name has been appropriated by schools, commercial establishments, cultural societies, and philanthropic organizations to honor him and associate themselves with his legend. This practice has been most often employed in naming municipalities and children. Nearly every state has at least one town or county named for Franklin, owing in large measure to his being perceived as “the perfect civic leader” by settlers of interior lands in the late eighteenth century and throughout the nineteenth century.2 During the same period, thousands of children have been named for him, and of those who were not, some of the most public-spirited have been bestowed with Franklinesque nicknames, such as Kentucky Gazette printer John Bradford, whose fellow Lexingtonians dubbed “The Benjamin Franklin of the West.” One Philadelphia newspaper noted in 1780, “The name of Franklin is sufficiently celebrated that one may glory in bearing it,” adding that the French were contending with the

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Benjamin Franklin's Printing Network: Disseminating Virtue in Early America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 295

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.