E-Mail: A Write It Well Guide : How to Write and Manage E-Mail in the Workplace

By Janis Fisher Chan | Go to book overview

5
CAUTIONARY TALES

One in five respondents (20%) has had employee e-mail and instant messages (IM) subpoenaed in the course of a lawsuit or regulatory investigation…. Another 13% have battled workplace lawsuits triggered by employee e-mail.

AMERICAN MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION AND EPOLICY INSTITUTE
2004 WORKPLACE E-MAIL AND INSTANT MESSAGING SURVEY

In 2001, Neal Patterson, the chief executive of the Cerner Corporation in Kansas City, Missouri, sent 400 managers an angry e-mail, berating them for not getting more than 40 hours of work a week out of their employees: “The parking lot is sparsely used at 8 a.m.; likewise at 5 p.m. As managers -- you either do not know what your EMPLOYEES are doing; or you do not CARE… you have a problem and you will fix it or I will replace you…. NEVER in my career have I allowed a team which worked for me to think they had a 40-hour job.” After the contents of the e-mail were posted on a Yahoo message board, Cerner stock declined 22 percent.

FROM “STINGING OFFICE MEMO BOOMERANGS”
EDWARD WONG, THE NEW YORK TIMES, APRIL 5, 2001

E-mail is risky business indeed. Angry messages sent in the heat of the moment can damage relationships with colleagues and clients. Rude, abrupt messages lead to misunderstandings that can have serious consequences. Every week we hear about how the wrong e-mail sent to the wrong person (or people) has gotten an individual or an organization in trouble.

It's a fact that misuse of e-mail can harm you professionally and cost your organization in terms of money and reputation. That's what this chapter is about: the bad things that can happen when we neglect to consider e-mail's potential for causing damage.

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
E-Mail: A Write It Well Guide : How to Write and Manage E-Mail in the Workplace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • E-Mail a Write It Well Guide - How to Write and Manage E-Mail in the Workplace i
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Think Before You Write 7
  • 2: Launching Your Message 37
  • 3: Managing Your E-Mail 71
  • 4: Present a Professional Image 93
  • 5: Cautionary Tales 137
  • The Back of the Book 151
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 184

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.