Managing Part-Time Study: A Guide for Undergraduates and Postgraduates

By Caroline Gatrell | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Had I not been a part-time student, this book would never have been written. My original (full-time) qualifications were in History of Art. However, my present career as a writer and an academic has developed as a consequence of gaining, from Lancaster University (where I now teach), an MBA and a PhD, both on a part-time basis. So the thanks below are due not only to those who have been with me through the process of writing this book, but also those who supported me during my previous years of part-time study.

First and foremost I would like to thank Tony and my parents Pam and Max for all their support while I undertook my MBA and my PhD. A very special thanks is owed to Tony, who lived through the PhD experience and was encouraging throughout. And thanks are due to my parents, both of whom, among other things, drove me quite long distances to research interviews when I was expecting Anna and Emma respectively.

I would like to thank those who offered academic guidance during my parttime study days – to David Brown, who supervised me during some major life changes – a wedding, an MBA, two babies and a PhD. Also to Rosemary Deem, for her wise counsel and for her continued support.

Thanks are due to many of my colleagues from past years – David Allen and Sue Brimelow who first sparked off my interest in Management Studies, and Richard Crail who encouraged me to embark on my MBA.

In my present role, I would like to thank my friends and colleagues who have supported me both in my role at Lancaster and in the writing of this book, especially John Mackness and Sally Watson. A very special thank you to Sarah Baines and Sarah Patterson (and thank you, Sarah P., for reading and commenting on drafts).

A debt is owed to my good friend Tony Watson for his ongoing mentorship and support in terms of both my own writing, and in relation more generally to the issues associated with part-time degree programmes.

Thanks go to all at Open University Press whose input to this book has been invaluable, and also to the reviewers for their helpful comments on the proposal which have helped to shape the book.

I would like to thank Rowena Murray for her friendship and for sharing her knowledge of writing practices which has been of personal benefit to me. Also thank you to those who took part in the 2005 Scottish Writers' Retreat, which definitely spurred me on through the mid-term blues when I was halfway through the book!

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Managing Part-Time Study: A Guide for Undergraduates and Postgraduates
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 167

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.