Nation and Novel: The English Novel from Its Origins to the Present Day

By Patrick Parrinder | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. E. P. Thompson, 'The Peculiarities of the English', in The Poverty of Theory and Other Essays (London: Merlin, 1978), 35–91.

2. Peter Brooks, Reading for the Plot: Design and Intention in Narrative (Cambridge, Mass., and London: Harvard University Press, 1992), 130.

3. Florence Noiville, 'Jonathan Coe, l'homme-orchestre', Le Monde (23 July 2004), p. viii: 'Que les “anglo-addicts” se rassurent. Le roman “made in England”—une appelation originale aussi authentique que le Pim's ou le Stilton—ne s'est jamais, lui, aussi bien porté' ['“Anglo-addicts” should take heart. The novel “made in England”—a label of origin as unmistakable as Pimm's or Stilton—is stronger than ever'].

4. Henry James, Letters, vol. iii: 1883–1895, ed. Leon Edel (London: Macmillan, 1981), 244; Milan Kundera, 'Wisdom of Being', Guardian, 27 January 1994, ii. 8.

5. Quoted in Ulick O'Connor, ed., The Joyce We Knew (Cork: Mercier, 1967), 97.

6. Cf. Jed Esty, A Shrinking Island: Modernism and National Culture in England (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2004), 1.

7. Bertrand Russell, Autobiography (London and New York: Routledge, 1998), 394.

8. Margaret Drabble, The Ice Age (New York: Popular Library, 1977), 15.

9. See Esty, A Shrinking Island, passim.

10. See e.g. Paul Langford, Englishness Identified: Manners and Character 1650–1850 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000).

11. Brooks, Reading for the Plot, 10.

12. Ibid. 26.

13. Krishan Kumar, The Making of English National Identity (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003).

14. Antony Easthope, Englishness and National Culture (London and New York: Routledge, 1999), 28.

15. See Linda Colley, Britons: Forging the Nation 1707–1837 (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1992); and Gerald Newman, The Rise of English Nationalism: A Cultural History 1740–1830 (London: Weidenfeld, 1987).


Chapter 1. The Novel and the Nation

1. The case is argued at length by Margaret Anne Doody, The True Story of the Novel (London: HarperCollins, 1997).

2. William Congreve, Incognita, in Paul Salzman, ed., An Anthology of Seventeenth-Century Fiction (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1991), 474.

-415-

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