Nation and Novel: The English Novel from Its Origins to the Present Day

By Patrick Parrinder | Go to book overview

Further Reading

This guide to further reading focuses on modern scholarship on the English novel and its history, excluding original editions, earlier collections, and simple reprints such as the early twentieth-century volumes of Everyman's Library and World's Classics (invaluable as many of these still are). For the sake of simplicity, books are in general only listed once, without cross-referencing even though they may be relevant to more than one chapter. The place of publication given is the first place mentioned on the title-page.


INTRODUCTION AND CHAPTER 1: THE NOVEL AND THE NATION

No history of the English novel from its beginnings can ignore earlier accounts such as Ernest A. Baker's ten-volume History of the English Novel (London, 1924–39) and Walter Allen's The English Novel (London, 1954). Still worth consulting, though manifestly partial and polemical, are Ford Madox Ford's The English Novel from the Earliest Days to the Death of Joseph Conrad (London, 1930), Ralph Fox's The Novel and the People (London, 1937), and Arnold Kettle's Introduction to the English Novel (2 vols., London, 1951). V. S. Pritchett's fine essays on English and European novelists were collected in The Living Novel (London, 1946)and The Working Novelist (London, 1965). Margaret Anne Doody's The True Story of the Novel (London, 1997) attempts to assimilate the history of the novel to that of prose fiction in general. Among numerous accounts of the nature of modern fictional interpretation, the best to my mind is Peter Brooks's Reading for the Plot: Design and Intention in Narrative (Cambridge, Mass., 1992). The novel's relationship to other literary genres is explored in Georg Lukács, The Historical Novel (London, 1962), and M. M. Bakhtin, The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays (Austin, Tex., 1981).

The quotations from Shakespeare in this chapter are from The Complete Works, ed. Peter Alexander (London, 1951). David Hume's 1748 essay 'Of National Character' is collected in his Political Essays, ed. Knud Haakanson (Cambridge, 1994). John Stuart Mill's Considerations on Representative Gov- ernment (1861) exists in many editions, although Walter Bagehot's essay on national character, Physics and Politics (1872), remains comparatively little known; see, however, Bagehot's Collected Works, 15 vols. (London, 1965–86). Anthony D. Smith's National Identity (London, 1991) is an authoritative recent study of its subject. Edward W. Said contrasts 'filiation' and affiliation' in The World, the Text, and the Critic (London, 1984). Perry Anderson foregrounds the concepts of national character and national identity in his review-article on 'Nation-States and National Identity', London Review of Books 13: 9 (9 May 1991), 3–8. Almost all recent scholarly discussions of nationhood have been

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