Developing Community Nursing Practice

By Sue Spencer; John Unsworth et al. | Go to book overview

7

It ain't what you do, it's the way
that you do it: new and different
approaches to practice

Kate Henderson-Nichol


Chapter summary

This chapter describes examples of developments in practice in four of the community nursing specialisms. It paints a very compelling and colourful picture of community nurses who seek more effective ways of meeting the needs of their client group. The process that such practitioners go through is vividly described and the issues that they face are explored. Readers are encouraged to read each case study and not concentrate solely on the ones that relate to their own community nursing specialism. The themes that emerge from each, namely networking and communication, evidence, leadership and empowerment, are important and can be translated to any sphere of practice development.


Case study 1: care in custody–myth or manageable?

Police flanked either side of a youth of 19 years old who gazed expressionless into the solemn eyes of the stipendiary magistrate as he pronounced the sentence. The court officiate grimly shuffled through the papers, ready for the next sunken-eyed prisoner to slouch into the dock. Andrew's mother broke down in tears, shaking her head in despair. Standing on her own, she was the butt of hatred and verbal abuse from a middle-aged lady whose son had been brutally assaulted with lighted matches, and who was subsequently hospitalized for a considerable length of time. The victim was unlikely to regain the vision in his left eye, and his handsome good looks were gone forever. A frenzied attack, all for a wallet with £25 in it and a watch, that turned out to be a fake anyway. Both women were in tears, one in fury on behalf of her son's loss of life

-158-

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