The Torah's Vision of Worship

By Samuel E. Balentine | Go to book overview

5.

THE LITURGY
OF COVENANT

AMONG THE EARLIEST TEXTS OF THE HEBREW BIBLE (E.G, JUDG. 5:5; Ps. 68:9) YHWH is identified as “the One of Sinai” (zeh sinay). The ascription serves as an ancient epithet for God. As J. Levenson has put it, Israel's God is the One “of whom Sinai is characteristic.”1 This identification with Sinai suggests two characteristics of God that are especially pertinent for the concerns of the present chapter.

First, the location of Sinai is finally indeterminate; it lies in the wilderness somewhere between Egypt and Canaan. This elusiveness functions in Hebraic tradition as a symbol of both YHWH's freedom and YHWH's authority. Like Sinai, YHWH's domain is beyond the boundaries of Egypt, of Canaan, of any given regime or state, ancient or modern, that may be located on a map. Like Sinai, YHWH's authority is not confined by, indeed may stand in opposition to, the sovereignty claimed by any earthly kingdom.

Second, Hebraic tradition identifies Sinai not primarily with an earthly place but with a divine act.2 Sinai is the place of God's salvation: for Moses and the people who flee from the Egyptians (Exod. 19); for Deborah and Barak who defeat the Canaanites (Judg. 5); for Elijah who flees in despair from Jezebel and the putative powers of state-sanctioned Baalism (1 Kings 19). Hebraic tradition asserts that whenever and wherever people encounter the God of Sinai, they will celebrate the memory of the One who rises up against the enemies of the righteous, nullifying their power and preserving the faithful with love and compassion. From their disparate experiences will come a uniform confession: “Blessed be the Lord, who daily bears us up; God is our salvation” (Ps. 68:19).

1. J. D. Levenson, Sinai and Zion: An Entry into the Jewish Bible (Minneapolis: Winston,
1985), 20.

2. On Sinai as the mountain that signifies God's salvation in the earliest traditions of the
Hebrew Bible, see F. Crüsemann, The Torah: Theology and Social History of Old Testament Law,
trans. A. W. Mahnke (Minneapolis: Fortress, 1996), 31–37.

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Torah's Vision of Worship
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.