The Construction of Communities in the Early Middle Ages: Texts, Resources and Artefacts

By Richard Corradini; Max Diesenberger et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHANGES IN THE TOPOGRAPHY OF POWER:
FROM CIVITATES TO VRBES REGIAE IN HISPANLA

Gisela Ripoll


The civitates of late Antiquity in the Iberian peninsula

The study of the changes in the topography of power in late Antiquity is directly linked to our knowledge of the period that immediately preceded it, that is the Roman World, and of the one which immediately followed it, in other words the Middle Ages.1 During late Antiquity, the dioecesis Hispaniarum was dependent on the prefecture of the Gauls and, in administrative terms, was organised as had been laid down in the last reorganization of Diocletian's age.

In his Etymologiae Isidore of Seville ratifies the information given by the Laterculus Veronensis, the Breviarium of R. Festus, the Laterculus Polemii Silvii, the Notitia Dignitatum and the Iulii Honorii Cosmographia,2 although very succinctly and without considering the Balearics as a separate province or as belonging to Hispania.3

The ciuitates that had been provincial capitals4 continued to be centres of prestige, containing a considerable urban area, from the 6th to the 8th centuries. Nearly all of them held the rank of metropolitan see, with the exception of Carthago Spartaria, which was replaced by Toletum, as will be seen below.

1 I would like to express my thanks to Dr. P. Banks for translating this text from
Spanish into English. I would also like to thank Dr. Isabel Velázquez of the
Gomplutense University, Madrid for the suggestions she has made. Similarly, my
thanks go to S. Margenat who provided help in the preparation and composition
of the text.

2 E. Albertini, Les divisions administratives de lEspagne romaine (Paris 1923) pp. 118–126;
J. Arce, El último siglo de la España romana, 284–409 (Madrid 1982) pp. 31–52, with
ample bibliography.

3 The text reads: (Hispania) habet prouincias sex: Tarraconensem, Cartaginensem, Lusitaniam.
Galliciam, Baeticam, et trans freta in regione Africae Tingitaniam
(San Isidore de Sevilla.
Etimologías XW, 4, 29, ed. J. Oroz and M.A. Marcos [Madrid 1982] p. 186).

4Tarraconensis with its capital in Tarraco; Carthaginensis with its capital in Carthago
Spartaria; Insulae baleares
with their capital in Palma./ Pollentia Baetica with its capital
in Corduba; Lusitania with its capital in Emerita; Gallaecia with its capital in Bracara
and finally Tingitana with its capital in Tingis.

-123-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Construction of Communities in the Early Middle Ages: Texts, Resources and Artefacts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 417

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?