Further Reading

Chapter 1

The foundation of twentieth-century feminist Shakespeare criticism—and a book that still repays careful reading—is Juliet Dusinberre's Shakespeare and the Nature of Women, originally published in 1975 (third edition, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003). The optimistic views of Dusinberre and other contemporary feminists concerning women's place in the drama and society of Shakespeare and his contemporaries were vigorously challenged by Lisa Jardine in Still Harping on Daughters: Women and Drama in the Age of Shakespeare (Brighton: Harvester, 1983). For a useful overview of the early progress of twentieth-century feminist Shakespeare criticism, see the Introduction and Selective Bibliography in The Woman's Part: Feminist Criticism of Shakespeare, edited by Carolyn Ruth Swift Lenz, Gayle Greene, and Carol Thomas Neely (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1980); and Philip C. Kolin's Shakespeare and Feminist Criticism: An Annotated Bibliography and Commentary (New York and London: Garland, 1991), which covers the years from 1977 to 1988. The current state of feminist Shakespeare criticism is well represented in Dympna Callaghan's richly varied anthology, A Feminist Companion to Shakespeare (Oxford: Blackwell, 2000). For a historical survey of earlier women's responses to Shakespeare, see Women Reading Shakespeare 1660—igoo: An Anthology of Criticism, edited by Ann Thompson and Sasha Roberts (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997).

One of the earliest and most influential readings of Elizabethan culture and of Shakespeare's plays that stresses the anxieties of men confronted by female authority and power is Louis Adrian Montrose's article A Midsummer Night's Dream and the Shaping Fantasies of Elizabethan Culture: Gender, Power, Form', in Margaret W. Ferguson, Maureen Quilligan, and Nancy J. Vickers (eds.), Rewriting the Renaissance: The Discourses of Sexual Difference in Early Modern Europe (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986), pp. 179-86. Later studies include Mark Breitenberg's book, Anxious Masculinity in Early Modern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996) and Steven Mullaney's article, 'Mourning and Misogyny: Hamlet, The Revenger's Tragedy, and the Final Progress of Elizabeth I, 1600-1607', Shakespeare Quarterly, 45 (1994), pp· 139-62

Impressive documentation of women's agency during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries can be found in Margaret Ezell, The Patriarch's

-138-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shakespeare and Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations x
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: A Usable History 7
  • 2: The Place(S) of Women in Shakespeare's World 26
  • 3: Our Canon, Ourselves 48
  • 4: Boys Will Be Girls 72
  • 5: The Lady's Reeking Breath 95
  • 6: Shakespeare S Timeless Women 112
  • Further Reading 138
  • Notes 145
  • Index 161
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 168

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.