Body Panic: Gender, Health, and the Selling of Fitness

By Shari L. Dworkin; Faye Linda Wachs | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

After ten years and a tremendous amount of work, it is difficult to remember each and every person we wish to thank. There have been many research assistants and volunteers such as Isabel Howe, Nancy Zheng, Lorraine Lothringer, Alyssa Sankin, Margo Weisberg, Rivkie Elbaum, Erin Winter, Kristen Nelson, Lori Ottaviano, Alicia Van Nice, Samantha Wolsky, and Dustin Hamm. All of these individuals were just extraordinary with their help, and we thank them. A lot of people commented on conference papers related to this work, including Mike Messner, Dan Cook, Cheryl Cooky, Jenny Higgins, and others. We also received comments on drafts of some of the chapters, so it is important to especially thank Linda Blum, Christine Williams, Kari Lerum, and Mike Messner, although there were others.

The intellectual inspiration that academics derive from others' hard work deserves a lot of special gratitude, and we rank the works of Mike Messner, Margaret Carlisle Duncan, Gary Dowsett, Toby Miller, Raewyn Connell, Susan Bordo, Leslie Heywood, Don Sabo, Mary MacDonald, Mary Jo Kane, Patricia Hill Collins, Jennifer Hargreaves, and Michael Kimmel as being the most influential. Mike Messner has mentored both of us in generous, consistent, and wonderful ways for many years, and we thank him enormously for that. Thanks to NYU Press for their patience, ease, and professionalism, and to Ilene Kalish for being a supreme editor. More special thanks go to Isabel Howe (yes, again!) for being such a pleasant and dedicated perfectionist and for helping us to get to the final stages of this project.

I (Shari) offer a lot of thanks to the coauthor of this book, Faye Linda Wachs. I have worked with Faye for over ten years, and her intellectual contributions, energy, fast mind, and steady hard work continue to amaze me. Thanks to her for lengthy discussions and the research and writing time she put into this project. Additionally, the way she boldly added consumption and consumer culture into the bodies/health/gender analysis

-vii-

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