Poetics before Plato: Interpretation and Authority in Early Greek Theories of Poetry

By Grace M. Ledbetter | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am grateful to Swarthmore College for a Mary Alberston Faculty Fellowship in 1997–98, when I began work on this book.

In his graduate seminars on the Iliad and the Odyssey, Pietro Pucci encouraged my first work on Homer and provided the inspiring example of his distinctive fusion of close textual work with provocative theoretical and literary analysis. He has my gratitude and profound admiration.

My efforts in this project to combine literary with philosophical analysis could have had no more exacting magisterial guides than Jenny Strauss Clay and Julius Moravcsik. Each offered detailed and invaluable suggestions at several different stages. Their encouragement, generosity, and independence of mind made it possible for me to stand by my own thoughts and ideas.

Earlier versions of several chapters benefited from comments by audiences at the University of Pennsylvania, the Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy, the University of Colorado at Boulder, Swarthmore College, and Haverford College. Sarah Raff's comments led me to improve each of the first three chapters. Robert Sklenar read an earlier version of chapter 1 and gave me useful comments. David Mankin provided steadfast friendship, as always, and guided my project toward publication. John Paul Christy's skillful assistance lifted many of the burdens of completing the manuscript. I am grateful also to Chuck Myers of Princeton University Press for his humane professionalism.

In translating from the Greek, I have relied heavily on Richmond Lattimore's Iliad and Odyssey, Norman O. Brown's Theogony, William Race's Loeb edition of Pindar, Paul Woodruff's Ion, and Stanley Lombardo's and Karen Bell's Protagoras.

The greatest thanks belong to my husband, Charles Raff, whose tireless support, intellectual companionship, and commitment to the highest standards of thought sharpened my own thinking about Socrates and the Greek poets.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Poetics before Plato: Interpretation and Authority in Early Greek Theories of Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Introduction - Poetry, Knowledge, and Interpretation 1
  • Chapter One - Supernatural Knowledge in Homeric Poetics 9
  • Chapter Two - Hesiod's Naturalism 40
  • Chapter Three - Pindar: the Poet as Interpreter 62
  • Chapter Four - Socratic Poetics 78
  • Chapter Five - Toward a Model of Socratic Interpretation 99
  • Bibliographic References 119
  • Index 125
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 128

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.