Poetics before Plato: Interpretation and Authority in Early Greek Theories of Poetry

By Grace M. Ledbetter | Go to book overview

Bibliographic References

Adam, J., and A. M. Adam. 1928. Platonis Protagoras. Cambridge.

Alden, M. J. “The Resonances of the Song of Ares and Aphrodite.” Mnemosyne 50: 513–29.

Annas, J. 1999. Platonic Ethics Old and New. Ithaca and London.

Arthur, M. 1983. “The Dream of a World Without Women: Poetics and the Circles of Order in the Theogony Prooemium.” Arethusa 16: 97–135.

Auerbach, E. 1953. “The Scar of Odysseus.” In his Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature. Trans. W R. Trask. Princeton.

Austin, N. 1994. Helen of Troy and Her Shameless Phantom. Ithaca.

Babut, D. 1975. “Simonide moraliste.” Rev. Etud. Grecq. 88: 20–62.

Barthes, R 1977. “The Death of the Author.” In Image-Music-Text. Essays Selected and Translated by S. Heath. New York.

Benson, H. 2000. Socratic Wisdom: The Model of Knowledge in Plato's Early Dialogues. New York.

Bergren, A. 1983. “Odyssean Temporality: Many (Re)Turns.” In Rubino, C, and C. Shelmerdine, Approaches to Homer. Austin.

Blanchot, M. 1982. The Sirens' Song. Bloomington.

Bloom, H. 1994. The Western Canon. New York.

Booth, W 1961. The Rhetoric of Fiction. Chicago.

Bowie, E. L. 1993. “Lies, Fiction and Slander in Early Greek Poetry.” In C. Gill and T. P. Wiseman, eds., Lies and Fiction in the Ancient World. Austin.

Bowra, C. M. 1964. Pindar. Oxford.

Brandwood, L. 1992. “Stylometry and Chronology.” In The Cambridge Companion to Plato, ed. R. Kraut. Cambridge.

Brooks, P. 1993. Body Work: Objects of Desire in Modern Narrative. Cambridge.

Brown, N. O., trans. 1953. Theogony/Hesiod. Indianapolis.

Bundy, E. L. 1962. Studia Pindarica. 2 pts. University of California Studies in Classical Philology 18.

Burnyeat, M. 1999. “Culture and Society in Plato's Republic.” In The Tanner Lectures on Human Values 20. Salt Lake City.

Carson, A. 1992. “How Not to Read a Poem: Unmixing Simonides From Protagoras.” CP87: 110–30.

Clay, J. S. 1983. The Wrath of Athena. Princeton.

____. 1988. “What the Muses Sang: Theogony 1–115.” Greek,Roman and Byzantine Studies 29: 323–33.

Cole, A. T. 1983. “Archaic Truth.” QUCC, n.s. 13: 7–28.

Crotty, K. 1994. The Poetics of Supplication. Ithaca.

Curtius, E. R. 1953. European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages. Princeton.

Demos, M. 1999. Lyric Quotation in Plato. New York.

De Jong, I. J. F. 1985. “Eurykleia and Odysseus' Scar: Odyssey 19.393–466.” CQ 35:517–18.

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Poetics before Plato: Interpretation and Authority in Early Greek Theories of Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • Introduction - Poetry, Knowledge, and Interpretation 1
  • Chapter One - Supernatural Knowledge in Homeric Poetics 9
  • Chapter Two - Hesiod's Naturalism 40
  • Chapter Three - Pindar: the Poet as Interpreter 62
  • Chapter Four - Socratic Poetics 78
  • Chapter Five - Toward a Model of Socratic Interpretation 99
  • Bibliographic References 119
  • Index 125
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