Children, Youth and Adults with Asperger Syndrome: Integrating Multiple Perspectives

By Kevin P. Stoddart | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Afterword

This collection of papers brings together various perspectives that might initially appear disparate in their views. Nevertheless, my hope is that the reader will also recognize the themes and issues that run throughout this book. Regardless of the “confusions and controversies” (Frith 2003) about AS, we have been able to generate an initial foundation of practice knowledge. It is exciting, and at the same time disconcerting, to realize that this knowledge base is not static. This volume has provided a survey of the current state of practice and research related to AS. First-hand accounts of ASDs have provided, and continue to provide, valuable instruction for the practitioner and researcher. It is hoped that this book will be a catalyst for similar future discussions.

Considering our preoccupation with defining a discrete set of symptoms that characterize “Asperger Syndrome”, we find our attempts are often problematic. Ultimately, a true understanding of AS must reach beyond the controversies about diagnosis, and beyond available research. The breadth of human personality, emotion, cognitive characteristics, social relating, sensory processing in a word, “neurodiversity” (Harmon 2004) cannot be simply captured, as Peter Jansen has stated, “in a static, inert framing of words”. This is not to say there is no utility in such a label; its worth is clear in this volume. However, realization must also occur as to the limits of this enterprise.

In any discussion of a “social disability” we cannot help take note of the various contexts in which such difference is most apparent in families, schools, workplaces, and the community. The presentation of symptoms related to AS is often dependent on the individual's surroundings. Any consideration of supporting individuals with AS therefore needs to be contextually based.

Many parents I have worked with embrace all the traits of their children with AS, including those related to AS. There is much about individuals with AS to enjoy, not the least of which is their strong appreciation for human diversity. As “neurotypical” as I profess to be, I am always strangely comforted when somebody with AS boasts about their knowledge of a particular subject, their narrow range of interests, or their ability to function without so much human

-362-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Children, Youth and Adults with Asperger Syndrome: Integrating Multiple Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 384

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.