A Gendered Collision: Sentimentalism and Modernism in Dorothy Parker's Poetry and Fiction

By Rhonda S. Pettit | Go to book overview

Bibliography

For convenience, this bibliography is divided into secdons: Primary Works of Dorothy Parker, Reviews of Dorothy Parker's Poetry, Reviews of Dorothy Parker's Ficdon, Reviews of The Portable Dorothy Parker, General Criticism of Dorothy Parker, and General Criticism and Other Primary Sources. Individual poems and stories by Parker used in this study that can be found in the published editions of her work are not listed here, but are included in the Notes section. Since her play reviews typically covered several plays in one review, the individual play tides she reviewed are not included here; these also are found in the Notes section. For additional source material, see Randall Calhoun's Dorothy Parker: A Bio-Bibliography, cited below.


PRIMARY WORKS OF DOROTHY PARKER

“The Actors' Demands.” [Helen Wells, pseud.] Vanity Fair (Oct. 1919): 47, 118.

After Such Pleasures (1933). NewYork: Sun Dial Press, 1940.

“The Anglo-American Drama: British Playwrights Do Much to Strengthen the Entente Cordiale.” Vanity Fair (Feb. 1920): 41, 102.

“Are You a Glossy?” Vanity Fair (Apr. 1918): 57, 90.

“In Broadway Playhouses: For Auld Lang Syne.” Ainslee's (Mar. 1922): 155–59.

“In Broadway Playhouses: The Comedy Blues.” Ainslee's (July 1922): 155–59.

“In Broadway Playhouses: Comic Relief.” Ainslee's (Nov. 1921): 154–59.

“In Broadway Playhouses: The Force of Example.” Ainslee's (May 1922): 155–57.

“In Broadway Playhouses: Hard Times.” Ainslee's (Feb. 1922): 155–59.

“In Broadway Playhouses: Laurels and Raspberries.” Ainslee's (Dec. 1920): 155–59.

“In Broadway Playhouses: Let 'er Go.” Ainslee's (Nov. 1922): 156–59.

“In Broadway Playhouses: National Institutions.” Ainslee's (Sept. 1920): 156–59.

“In Broadway Playhouses: Nights Off.” Ainslee's (June 1921): 157–59.

“In Broadway Playhouses: Plays in the Past and Present Tense.” Ainslee's (Aug. 1920):155–59.

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