Student's Guide to Landmark Congressional Laws on Social Security and Welfare

By Steven G. Livingston | Go to book overview

13

Medicare and Medicaid: The
Social Security Amendments of
1965

Medicare stands second only to Social Security among social legislation passed in the twentieth century. Providing comprehensive medical coverage to individuals over 65, the program has not only assisted millions of senior citizens in obtaining health care, vastly improving their quality of life, it has also transformed the practice of American medicine. Medicare is the fastest growing, and perhaps the most complicated, of America's social insurance programs. Its complexity and price tag ensure that the program will continue to be hotly debated in coming years. Medicaid, a companion program that covers the health needs of the indigent, has similarly expanded in cost and coverage. It is today one of the major expenses of state governments, and lays behind many a budget battle. Yet it, too, has provided significant benefits to millions of Americans. In retrospect, that the United States would provide such programs may seem obvious. But, in fact, they were—and are—extremely controversial, and were enacted only after a bitter and protracted struggle of nearly 30 years.

That struggle began during the administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Roosevelt, as we have seen, had initially intended to include a health care plan in his Social Security program. He decided to drop the idea because its cost, complexity, and potential political opposition threatened to sink the entire bill. That did not stop his political allies, led by the New York Senator Robert Wagner, from introducing a first comprehensive health care bill in 1940. This bill died, as did the more ambitious Wagner-Murray-Dingell bill of 1943. Roosevelt then included medical coverage in his “Economic

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Student's Guide to Landmark Congressional Laws on Social Security and Welfare
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.