Culture Incorporated: Museums, Artists, and Corporate Sponsorships

By Mark W. Rectanus | Go to book overview

5. Sponsoring Events: Culture as
Corporate Stage, from Woodstock
to Ravestock and Reichstock

I would like to begin and end this discussion with two examples of events that were not sponsored and that were represented in the media as expressions of resistance to or subversion of commodified culture: Woodstock and Christo and Jeanne-Claude's Wrapped Reichstag.1 We might consider the temporal and spatial distance between Woodstock and the Wrapped Reichstag not simply as beginning or ending points but, rather, as markers that can assist us in an analysis of the event within postindustrial societies and postmodern culture. Both Woodstock and the Wrapped Reichstag became reference points and signifiers of culture and politics, albeit in different cultural and historical contexts.

In his definition of architecture “as the combination of spaces, events, and movements without any hierarchy or precedence among these concepts,” Bernard Tschumi traces the “insertion” of the event, as a notion central to the social practice of architecture, to the sociopolitical demonstrations and actions of the late 1960s, particularly “les événements” (e.g., street barricades) in Paris, which represented both social events and social movements (Tschumi 1994, 255). Tschumi refines this notion by adapting Michel Foucault's concept of event as “the moment of erosion, collapse, questioning, or problematization of the very assumptions of the setting within which a drama may take place—occasioning the chance or possibility of another, different setting.”2 For Tschumi, Foucault's event is ultimately a “turning point—not an origin or an end.” Moreover, Tschumi proposes integrating shock as a critical aspect of the event, which “in order to be effective in our mediated culture, in our culture of images, must go beyond Walter Benjamin's definition and combine the idea of function or action with that of image” (257).

Certainly, Woodstock and the Wrapped Reichstag involved various forms of “erosion,” “questioning,” or “problematization” of their respective sites. In the case of Woodstock, the sense of community that emerged spontaneously as a result of both the unexpected magnitude of the event and the physical conditions (rain, mud, and insufficient sanitation and food) was related to its “failure” to function as a planned, commercial event. Indeed, by most accounts the event itself was a disaster (Espen 1994, 73). Yet the sense of “being there,” of “surviving the event,” of sensory “shock,”

-132-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Culture Incorporated: Museums, Artists, and Corporate Sponsorships
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 300

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.