Responsibility in World Business: Managing Harmful Side-Effects of Corporate Activity

By Lene Bomann-Larsen; Oddny Wiggen | Go to book overview

1
Addressing side-effect harm in the
business context: Conceptual and
practical challenges

Oddny Wiggen and Lene Bomann-Larsen

In 2001, 51 of the 100 largest economies in the world were private companies, not states.1 This makes the private sector a major actor on the global arena – an actor with considerable impact on the societies in which it operates. With such power comes responsibility.

Increased scrutiny of the actions of private companies has placed the responsibility of the private sector on the global agenda. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs), researchers, policy makers, media, consumers, and public opinion – and not least the United Nations, with its Global Compact initiative and Millennium Development Goals – all have a critical eye on corporate actors. To accommodate these increased expectations, the private sector itself has responded with corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives and programmes for promoting development, such as the World Business Council for Sustainable Development. New concepts such as corporate citizenship and corporate governance are on everyone's lips, and new and unexpected alliances pop up under headings such as “partnership for development”.

The focus on the private sector and its social and environmental obligations increases awareness of social and environmental issues both externally and internally, and may lay the groundwork for a reinterpretation of the role of corporations, of their purpose and legitimacy beyond the profit margin. On the other hand, the many competing concepts and approaches, as well as a lack of coherence in expectations and responses, may not only lead to fatigue but also serve as a wordy cover-up for a

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Responsibility in World Business: Managing Harmful Side-Effects of Corporate Activity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 288

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.