Libel Law, Political Criticism, and Defamation of Public Figures: The United States, Europe, and Australia

By Peter N. Amponsah | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1 See an analysis of Dewey's idea of communication in Carl Bybee, Can Democracy Survive in the Post-Factual Age?: A Return to the LippmannDewey Debate about the Politics of News, 1 Journalism and Mass Communication Monograph 1, 27–56 (1999). Bybee analyzed the ideas of both Lippmann and Dewey about democratic theory. He said both theorists agreed on the importance of communication. “For the public to act as a public requires open and free communication in order to inform itself of the current state of affairs and to debate the consequences of individual and associated behavior in order to judge their value in terms of the shared interests of the public” (at 55). Bybee added that Lippmann believed this role of communication no longer possible in the democracy because of the size and complexity of government and the basic irrationality of human action. But Dewey believed in the enduring relevance of the role communication is expected to play in the liberal theory of democracy.

2 Rodney A. Smolla, Free Speech in an Open Society 3 (Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., 1992).

3 For example, the United States' Constitution guarantees the right of freedom of speech in the First Amendment. In Britain, freedom of speech has nonconstitutional status as a legal principle, but it is an accepted political principle that affects the interpretation of statutes and the development of judicial doctrines.

4 Amy Gutmann, How Liberal Is Democracy? in Douglas MacLean and Claudia Hills, eds, Liberalism Reconsidered 25–50 (Rowman & Allanheld 1983).

5 Kent Greenawalt, Speech, Crime, and the Uses of Language 4 (Oxford University Press, 1989).

6 Julianne Schultz, Reviving the Fourth Estate: Democracy, Accountability and the Media 70 (Cambridge University Press, 1998), said:

In the United States, where rights to freedom of the press and
expression and individual rights are explicitly stated… the news
media has used its constitutional authority to add force to the
argument that it should operate unfettered. In countries such as
Australia and Britain, where there is no constitutional
acknowledgment of the right to freedom of speech and the press, the

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Libel Law, Political Criticism, and Defamation of Public Figures: The United States, Europe, and Australia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.