Uprooting Children: Mobility, Social Capital, and Mexican American Underachievement

By Robert Ketner Ream | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book is both the subject and in many ways the product of social capital, an example of how not only what you know, but who you know, can lead to productive ends. I completed my PhD, under the direction of Russell W. Rumberger, in Fall 2001 at the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education at UC Santa Barbara. It was then my good fortune to have professor Barbara Schneider of the University of Chicago introduce me to Marta Tienda, director of Princeton University's Office of Population Research. Upon professor Tienda's invitation, I traveled cross-country to New Jersey that fall, where I enjoyed the postdoctoral freedom to fortify the idea-foundation underlying this book. I am greatly indebted to all these wonderful scholars, especially Russ Rumberger, who, as my intellectual mentor and friend, has generously encouraged me to partake of (and perhaps make a small contribution to) the “paradise of knowledge.”

There are others who have made significant contributions to my development as a researcher; I have benefited from many excellent teachers. None have been more instrumental to my scholarly growth, however, than professor Rumberger, UC Santa Barbara political scientist Lorraine M. McDonnell, and education professor Richard P. Durân, who have consistently modeled a standard of research excellence I strive to live up to. Gevirtz School Dean Jules Zimmer also deserves special thanks for reminding me that “it's a good life!” we lead in pursuit of understanding

Preparation of this manuscript would not have been possible without the combined assistance of The Spencer Foundation and the RAND Corporation. I am especially indebted to Spencer Foundation Senior Program Officer Margaret Jay Braatz, as well as RAND Education Director Dominic Brewer and Associate Director Charles Goldman, for their steadfast support of the work reflected here. I owe a similar debt to the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and its staff, in particular Jeanie Murdock. Two AERA fellowships in different years provided core support of important data collection and analysis phases of this project. In addition, I am grateful for the financial assistance that has been provided in successive stages by the UC Institute for Mexico and the United States, the UC Linguistic Minority Research Institute, and the UC Santa Barbara Center for Chicano Studies. I am also indebted to professors Steven

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