Leonardo Da Vinci: The Marvellous Works of Nature and Man

By Martin Kemp | Go to book overview

List of Plates

All the illustrated works are by Leonardo unless otherwise indicated.

1Giotto, Christ before the High Priest (c. 1305), Padua, Arena Chapel (Capella Scrovegni)3
2Masaccio, The Trinity with the Virgin, St John and Donors (c. 1426–7), Florence, S. Maria Novella8
3Antonio Pollaiuolo, Battle of the Nude Men (c. 1475?), engraving, London, British Museum17
4Verrocchio (and workshop?), Madonna and Child in Front of a Ruined Basilica (The 'Ruskin Madonna') (c. 1470–3), Edinburgh, National Gallery of Scotland20
5Studies of Heads and Machines (1478), pen and ink, Florence, Uffizi22
6Study of a Warrior in Profile (c. 1476), metalpoint, London, British Museum24
7Verrocchio, Study of a Lady's Head with Elaborate Coiffure (c. 1474), black chalk, bistre and white, London, British Museum25
8Study of a Lily (Lilium candidum) (c. 1473), black chalk, pen and ink and wash, Windsor, Royal Library (12418)27
9Ginevra de' Benci (1476–8), Heraldic Motive on reverse, Washington, National Gallery of Art, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund29
10Study of a Tuscan Landscape (1473), pen and ink, Florence, Uffizi30
11Study for a Madonna's (?) Head (c. 1481), metalpoint, Louvre, Paris33
12Study for the Madonna and Child with a Cat (c. 1480–2), pen and ink, London, British Museum35
13Study for the Madonna and Child with a Cat (c. 1480–2), pen and ink and wash, London, British Museum (reverse of Plate 12)36
14Verrocchio, Putto with a Dolphin (c. 1470), Florence, Palazzo Vecchio39
15Studies for the Bust of an Infant (c. 1495), red chalk, Windsor, Royal Library (12519 and 12567)41
16Four Studies of a Horse's Foreleg (c. 1490), metalpoint, Budapest, Museum of Fine Arts42
17Studies of a Woman's Head and Shoulders (c. 1478), metalpoint, Windsor, Royal Library (12513)44
18Filippo Lippi and Fra Angelico, Adoration of the Magi (c. 1455), Washington, National Gallery of Art, Samuel H. Kress Collection45

-vii-

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