Research Methods in Family Therapy

By Douglas H. Sprenkle; Fred P. Piercy | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 14
Task Analysis of Couple
and Family Change Events

BRENT BRADLEY
SUSAN M. JOHNSON


BACKGROUND

The air in the room weighed heavy as the couple and therapist once again hit an
impasse. “If I could only talk about my fear,” confided the husband as he gazed
down at the floor. The atmosphere was tense as the couple therapist aided the
more blaming spouse in “softening” toward his partner—a pivotal change event
in the emotionally focused approach.

A chance for Change was knocking on the office door.

Panic coursed through the therapist's veins. His tensing body screamed,
“What do I do now? I can feel that this is big. I've never seen him this vulnerable.
This is really important. I've got to help him, and both of them. But I don't know
what to do when he talks so deeply of his 'fear.'

“My fear is just so big,” the husband continued.

Change rapped even more loudly on the door, now demanding to be let in.

The husband took a deep breath and sighed.

The therapist had read the theories and the research studies many times, but
though these gave an overview, he desperately needed a more detailed map. The
therapist was stuck, paralyzed.

“But I just can't talk about it,” the husband declared in defeat. “It's just too
much.”

The room fell awkwardly silent. The opportunity for Change was missed.

Therapists face similar situations on a daily basis. After learning about a new theory or intervention, or reading a research study, a therapist may think, “This makes sense. I am going to start doing this.” But in sessions with clients, things often don't go as smoothly as they are presented in the abstract pages of a manual or lists of interventions in a research study.

Mountains of research support and charismatic presenters matter little when clinicians are unable to translate application into the moment-to-moment process of a key

-254-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Research Methods in Family Therapy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 476

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.