Individualized Supports for Students with Problem Behaviors: Designing Positive Behavior Plans

By Linda M. Bambara; Lee Kern | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
Responding to Problem Behavior

LEE KERN

Chapters 8 and 9 have described antecedent/setting event interventions and alternative skill instruction. As we have discussed, these components are critical to a comprehensive positive behavior support (PBS) plan because they can prevent problem behavior from occurring and teach alternative and more appropriate behaviors. Well-designed antecedent/setting event and alternative skill interventions can dramatically reduce problem behavior. However, in spite of the hope of every support team, unfortunately even the most carefully designed PBS plan does not always eliminate problem behaviors completely. This is not good news. It is very discouraging to spend days, weeks, or even months developing a plan, only to find that problem behaviors still occur. However, when problem behaviors come to the attention of support teams and are serious enough to warrant a comprehensive behavior support plan, they have usually been practiced over an extended period of time and have, in some way, met the needs of the individual. Given this history, it is unreasonable to anticipate that problem behaviors will readily vanish. As such, comprehensive support plans are remiss if they do not include carefully considered strategies for responding to problem behaviors.

This chapter addresses the third component of a PBS plan: responses to problem behavior, also called response interventions. Various response approaches are described, along with considerations for selecting a specific intervention approach. In addition, background information is provided

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