The Jews of the Middle East and North Africa in Modern Times

By Reeva Spector Simon; Michael Menachem Laskier et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction

This volume began with an informal discussion by the three editors at the annual meeting of the American Historical Association in 1992. Recognizing the proliferation in the United States of college and university departments in both Middle Eastern and Jewish history, we noted the increasing interest in the role of Middle Eastern and North African Jews in shaping their societies. However, even with the significant monographs that have appeared since the 1980s highlighting aspects of the history and culture of the Jews in the Ottoman Empire, Eretz Israel (Palestine), Iran, North Africa, and their successor states of the twentieth century, we, like many of our colleagues, were frustrated that no one had done a coherent synthesis to present to our students in our courses on Jews of the modern Middle East.

This lacuna in both Jewish and Middle Eastern studies is partly because general histories of the region write Jews out of the standard narrative. As part of the religious and ethnic mosaic that was traditional Islamic society, Jews were but one among numerous minorities. As dhimmis, they played a subordinate role in the dominant Muslim society and appear intermittently, most notably as individuals who participated in certain economic niches.

Until modern times the story of the Jews in the region appeared in travelers' accounts and responsa literature (decisions from rabbis in response to submitted queries). With the development in the West of a scientific approach to the study of the Jewish people, however, Jewish historians of the nineteenth century analyzed their society in the context of the “Jewish question” posed by the Christian West. From a Eurocentric perspective the Jews, along with the non-Christian peoples in the Middle East and Asia, were perceived as the Other.

But just as European Christians touted the superiority of the West over the “Orient,” European Jews examined their own history Eurocentrically and praised the aristocrats of European Jewry, the Sephardim who achieved parity in multicultural medieval Spain, and in turn lamented the plight of Ashkenazi Jewry, persecuted and exiled from community to community. European Jews marginalized the other (non-European) Jews and Sephardim who settled in Europe and examined them in all their Otherness and

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Jews of the Middle East and North Africa in Modern Times
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 552

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.