Sisters in the Struggle: African American Women in the Civil Rights-Black Power Movement

By Bettye Collier-Thomas; V. P. Franklin | Go to book overview

Contributors

Bettye Collier-Thomas is Professor of History and Director of the Center for African American History and Culture at Temple University. She is the author of Daughters of Thunder: Black Women Preachers and Their Sermons, 1850–1979 (1998); co-author of My Soul Is a Witness: A Chronology of the Civil Rights Era, 1954–1965 (2000); and the compiler and editor of A Treasury of African American Christmas Stories, Vols. I and II (1997, 1999). Collier-Thomas is a co-editor of the award winning African American Women and the Vote (1997). She is currently working on a comprehensive history of “African American Women and Religion, 1780–2000.”

Vicki Crawford is Associate Professor of History at Clark-Atlanta University. She is a co-editor of Women in the Civil Rights Movement: Trailblazers and Torchbearers (1990). She has published numerous articles on African American women in the black freedom struggle, including “Race, Class, Gender and Culture: Black Women's Activism in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement.” Crawford is currently working on an oral history entitled “Harmony: The Life and Times of Winson Hudson, A Black Woman Activist in the South.”

Cynthia Griggs Fleming is Associate Professor of History and AfricanAmerican Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She is the author of Soon We Will Not Cry: The Liberation of Ruby Doris Smith Robinson (1998), and the co-author of The Chicago Handbook for Teachers: A Practical Guide to the College Classroom (1999). Fleming is currently working on a study of the Civil Rights Movement in Wilcox County, Alabama.

V. P. Franklin is Professor of History and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University; and Rosa and Charles Keller Professor of Arts and Humanities, Xavier University of Louisiana. He is the author of several books, including Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Biography (1998);

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