Sin No More: From Abortion to Stem Cells, Understanding Crime, Law, and Morality in America

By John Dombrink; Daniel Hillyard | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Thanks first to Val Jenness as a colleague whose interest in this developing project, helpful comments on an early draft of chapter 1, and invitation to participate in a forum on “Morality Battles” in Contemporary Sociology helped advance the development of the themes of the book. Special thanks to Arlene Skolnick for including early formulations of this book in the excellent four-part series on the American family she edited for Dissent magazine in 2004 and 2005.

The authors also thank the following colleagues who have given us early comments and advice: Kitty Calavita (for helpful comments on early notions of the work), Gilbert Geis, Ron Huff, Henry Pontell, Richard Perry, Jonathan Simon, Karim Ismaili, Roger Magnusson, Ron Weitzer, Harry Mersmann, Joel Best, Michael Walzer, and the anonymous reviewers of the manuscript for NYU Press. At the University of California, Irvine, Christine Byrd encouraged and placed an opinion article on the Schiavo case.

Dan Hillyard benefited from insightful comments by Southern Illinois University Writing Circle participants Bill Wells, Joe Schafer, Martha Henderson, George Burruss, Matt Giblin, Todd Armstrong, and Gaylene Armstrong. SIU colleagues Jim LeBeau, Joan McDermott, and Jim Garofalo also provided learned advice. Thanks also to Shirley Clay Scott, Alan Vaux, Tom Castellano, Marc Reidel, Bob Lorinskas, and Amanda Mathias

We also appreciate the work of the following student research assistants who have helped on various aspects of the book: at UCI, Sean Geraghty, Matt Udink, Erin Pinkus, Ruby Simjee, Ronald Baldonado, Andrea Galanti, Holly Lam, Michael Borokhov, and Cylia Villegas. At SIU: Sarah Knight, Wendy Goldberg, Mark Gauen, and Steve Sikorski.

We also benefited from the insights of UCI graduate students Glenda Kelmes, Erik Fritsvold, Tomson Nguyen, and Johnny Nhan, who served

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