Sin No More: From Abortion to Stem Cells, Understanding Crime, Law, and Morality in America

By John Dombrink; Daniel Hillyard | Go to book overview

7
Conclusion
To Form a More Purple Union?

Now that values voters have delivered for George Bush, he must
deliver for their values. The defense of innocent unborn human
life, the protection of marriage and the nomination and confirma-
tion of federal judges who will interpret the Constitution, not
make law from the bench, must be first priorities, come January.

—Michael Skube, “We're Saved. You Lost. Now What?” (2004)

We believe voters are open to an even bolder statement—no more
debates about changing abortion and gay marriage, either way; no
more constitutional amendments; and no more Terri Schiavo all-
nighters for 2 years, until Congress does something about high gas
prices and American jobs.

—Stan Greenberg and James Carville, “Getting Heard:
Points of Engagement for a Change Election” (2006)

Americans are closely divided, but we are not deeply divided, and
we are closely divided because many of us are ambivalent and un-
certain, and consequently reluctant to make firm commitments to
parties, politicians, or politics. We divide evenly in elections or sit
them out entirely because we instinctively seek the center while the
parties and candidates hang out on the extremes.

—Morris Fiorina, Culture War? The Myth of a
Polarized America
(2005)


Introduction: Polarization and the Importance of the
“Values Voters” Revisited

The resolution of American morality contests surrounding the issues of the preceding chapters, especially in the 2004–2006 period, has been the focus of this book. In this conclusion, we consider the meaning of

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