Sin No More: From Abortion to Stem Cells, Understanding Crime, Law, and Morality in America

By John Dombrink; Daniel Hillyard | Go to book overview

Index
three “A's,” 29
“five nonnegotiables,” 6, 29
7-Eleven stores, 52
60 Minutes (television show), 140, 186
700 Sundays (Crystal), 93, 126
1980 presidential election, 70, 246
1992 presidential election, 70
2000 presidential election, 79, 187
2002 midterm elections, 79
2004 presidential election, 1–6; abortion, 5, 70–71, 247; Bush (George W.) and, 1, 2, 4–5, 22, 53, 66, 74, 82, 125, 187, 204; Catholics, 204; contestation of personal morality after, 82; Democratic Party, 5–6, 246–247; Dobson and, 2; Falwell and, i2; gay marriage, 5, 6, 97, 120; Iraq War, 5, 247; Kerry and, 4, 6, 70–71, 74; moral values, 5; New York Times, 2, 4–5; samesex marriage, 121, 247; stem cell research, 210; value voters, 10, 53, 61, 82, 226, 228, 235–236, 238, 242
2006 midterm elections, 250–256; abortion, 252; de-alignment during, 253; Democratic Party, 29, 250–251, 254; Dionne on, 254; Iraq War, 252; liberalization, 256; Missouri, 211, 213, 222–223; political moderates, 254; Reagan Democrats, 253; Republican Party, 180–181, 250–252, 253–255; same-sex marriage, 252; Schiavo case, 181, 222; social conservatives, 250, 255; stem cell research, 221, 222–224, 251, 252; value voters, 226, 250, 252–253; Western states, 253
ABC (network), 26
ABC News poll, 74, 136, 212
ABC News/Washington Post poll, 76
abortion, 53–92; 2004 presidential election, 5, 70–71, 247; 2006 midterm elections, 252; “abortion grays,” 83–84, 235; abortion providers, 87–88; “absolute right” framing, 71–72; ambivalence about, 53, 56–57, 73–78, 212; American Medical Association, 16; antiabortion activists, 198, 208–209; attitudes toward, 13, 15–16, 19; autonomy, 85; Bush (George W.) and, 205; cartoons/graphic depictions of, 79–80; Catholic Church, 71, 78, 113, 194; Catholics, 75–76; Christian Coalition, 70; Christian Right, 24, 69–70; compassion, 244245; contestation of, 70; counties lacking abortion providers, 87; courts, 241; criminalization of, 16, 90, 141; culture wars, 68; Democratic Party, 77, 82–84; demography, 15–16; “Dilation and Extraction for Late Second Trimester Abortion” (Haskell), 79; federalism, 241; government intrusion into family affairs, freedom from, 222; incest, 87; judicial activism, 72–73; late-term/“partial birth” abortions, 56, 57, 70, 76, 78–82, 90–92; legal shifts against, 240; liberalization of abortion laws, 69; life of the mother, 87; litmus test on, 70; Louisiana, 88; Medicare funding, 56; Ohio, 88; parental consent, 78, 85, 235; Partial-Birth Abortion Act, 82; pragmatism about, 185; pre-Roe v. Wade years, 68–69; primary users, 85; privacy, 85; pro-choice movement, 57, 75, 76–77, 78, 86–87, 89, 90; pro-life movement, 57, 68, 70, 71, 75, 78–79; Protestants, 75–76; public support for legal abortion, 53, 57, 69, 73–78, 89; rape, 87; Reagan Democrats, 70; reduction in number of, 90; Roe v. Wade (see Roe v. Wade); Schiavo case, 133; social conservatives, 98, 126; “Sodomized Religious Virgin Exception,” 88; South Dakota 2006 law, 53, 87–88, 90, 252; stability regarding, period of, 70; stem cell research, 190, 220–222; teenage access, 56; vacuum aspiration, 80; woman's health, 57, 81–82, 85, 91; young women, 89
Abramoff, Jack, 49
abstinence, 86

-311-

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