Making Political Science Matter: Debating Knowledge, Research, and Method

By Sanford F. Schram; Brian Caterino | Go to book overview

13
Political Science and Political Theory
The Heart of the Matter

David Kettler

When Bent Flyvbjerg raises a call to “re-enchant and empower social science” (2001, 166), he may be understood, at least in part, to be renewing the demand for a “new political science” that had already mobilized an earlier generation (Kettler 1974; Wolfe 1970). Like the members of that cohort, he rightly despairs of the disciplinary preference for studies that are designed more to display and refine techniques of analysis than to seek answers to the questions that attend efforts to respond to the political urgencies of the times. Social scientists in general and political scientists in particular, intoxicated with methodology, are forever looking where the light of science is deemed to shine brightest, and not where the key objects of value have been lost. The question was then and the question is now, however, whether the best antidote is, so to speak, a hair of the dog. Flyvbjerg asks us to set about reversing the situation where social science is the “loser in the Science Wars.” I am not persuaded that this is a valuable or achievable objective, and I will argue that those of us who share his larger concerns would do better to “declare victory” and to withdraw from that theater of operations, which is not of our choosing.

Philosophy is a demanding autonomous discipline with its own claims to respect; the self-reflection of critical intellectuals in the social sciences is best served by steady attention to what other working social scientists say and do in close conjunction with their actual studies. Mediations between the two domains take varied forms. Obviously, there will be learning from and bargaining with philosophical writers, but judgments will be more commonly made good by social science results than by improvised “refu

-234-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Making Political Science Matter: Debating Knowledge, Research, and Method
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 304

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.