A Brief and Tentative Analysis of Negro Leadership

By Ralph J. Bunche; Jonathan Scott Holloway | Go to book overview

4
Leadership Schedules

An identification schedule containing 88 names of prominent Negroes and including a few whites of prominence in the interracial field was drawn up with a view toward experimentally testing the extent to which Negro leaders are known to Negroes. (See Appendix II, for sample of this schedule). The schedule included prominent Negroes in several different fields of activity, covering education, organization leaders, political leaders, newspaper publishers and journalists, artists and popular entertainers, radicals and insurrectionists, churchmen, business leaders, scientists and authors. The schedule called for multiple identification as to (1) race, (2) living or dead, and (3) occupation or activity for which individual is best known. A total of 896 of these schedules were completed. They were submitted to the group from which most favorable scores might be anticipated—Negro college students. Negro college students, largely, in the social science classes at Howard University (Washington, D.C.), Atlanta University (Atlanta, Ga.), Dillard University (New Orleans, La.), Prairie View State College (Prairie View, Texas), North Carolina State College for Negroes (Durham, N.C.), Shaw University (Raleigh, N.C.), Tuskegee Institute, Miner Teachers College (of Washington, D.C.), and Kentucky State College (Frankfort, Ky.) submitted to the test.30

These schedules have not yet been fully tabulated. The columns involving racial and living or dead identifications have been worked over, but time has not permitted the analysis of the occupation percentage scores.

My assumption has been that Negro leadership has not impressed itself greatly upon the consciousness of the Negro population. There is nothing in the returns from this explanatory effort which would greatly disturb that view. Though the schedule was employed only with Negro students in Negro colleges, who it can be assumed have had more contact with Negro history materials than any other group of Negroes, who

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A Brief and Tentative Analysis of Negro Leadership
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Note on Editorial Policy and Formatting xiii
  • 1: A General Survey of Negro Leadership 39
  • 2 64
  • 3: Life Histories Analysis 156
  • 4: Leadership Schedules 190
  • 5: Conclusion 194
  • Index 225
  • About the Author and the Editor 229
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