American Furies: Crime, Punishment, and Vengeance in the Age of Mass Imprisonment

By Sasha Abramsky | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
ADULT TIME

Mentally ill adults weren't the only new group experiencing the country's expansive penal hospitality by the last decade of the twentieth century. Increasingly, as prisons took center stage, teenagers were being removed from the purview of the juvenile courts, tried and sentenced as adults in adult courts, and sent to adult prisons. It was a startling development, a U-turn from over a century of juvenile-justice practice that had looked to create separate institutions for youngsters, based primarily on rehabilitation and education. Like so much else in the emotionally charged arena of crime and punishment, the shift grew out of an increasingly potent national sense of victimhood and public desire for revenge.

In a manner not too dissimilar to that of the notorious “hanging judges” of eighteenth- and early-nineteenth-century England, who were not averse to sentencing children to hang for crimes such as theft, or at least to ordering them deported to ferocious penal colonies in far-off lands,1 so many contemporary American politicians, prosecutors, and judges seemed almost eager to deal with teenagers in as steely a manner as the U.S. Constitution would permit.

In the late winter of 2001, fourteen-year-old Lionel Tate was sentenced to life in prison in Florida for killing a six-year-old girl during a mock wrestling game a couple years earlier. So jarring was the image of a tear-stained, chubbyfaced boy being told he would spend the rest of his life behind bars that it produced an almost instant national and international outcry. Within days, Tate had been moved from an adult prison to a secure unit in a juvenile facility. A clutch of high-powered appellate attorneys, led by the inimitable Johnnie Cochran, of O. J. Simpson notoriety, and Barry Scheck, of the New York-based Innocence Project, had clambered aboard the case. Soon Florida governor Jeb Bush was letting it be known that, while he generally favored a no-nonsense approach to criminals that he called “tough love,” he might eventually be amenable to signing some sort of clemency deal for the boy.

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Furies: Crime, Punishment, and Vengeance in the Age of Mass Imprisonment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction - From Out of Tartarus ix
  • Part One - A Mindset Molded 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Holy Experiment 3
  • Chapter 2 - A Rising Tide of Violence 23
  • Chapter 3 - Using a Sledgehammer to Kill a Gnat 43
  • Chapter 4 - Victims, Fundamentalists, and Rant-Radio Hacks 59
  • Chapter 5 - Reductio Ad Absurdum 73
  • Part Two - Populating Bedlam 89
  • Chapter 6 - Open for Business 91
  • Chapter 7 - Till the End of Time 107
  • Chapter 8 - Storehouses of the Living Dead 129
  • Chapter 9 - Adult Time 153
  • Conclusion 169
  • Acknowledgments 179
  • Notes 181
  • Selected Bibliography 199
  • Index 207
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.