World War II and Mexican American Civil Rights

By Richard Griswold Del Castilo | Go to book overview

Selected Annotated Bibliography

Allsup, Carl. The American G.I. Forum: Origins and Evolution. Austin: Center for Mexican American Studies, University of Texas at Austin, 1982. A general overview of the history of this early Mexican American civil rights organization formed after the war.

Camarillo, Albert. “Research Note on Chicano Community Leaders: The G.I. Generation.” Aztlan 2, no. 1 (Spring 1971): 145–150. Makes the point that many civil rights activists were organizers in the 1930s, but that the war did spawn a new generation of activists.

Campbell, Julie. “Madres y Esposas: Tucson's Spanish-American Mothers and Wives Association.” Journal of Arizona History 31, no. 2 (1990): 161–182. A study of how women were active in supporting the war efort and defining themselves as Americans.

Canales, J. T. Personal Recollections of J. T. Canales. Brownsville, Texas, 1945. Canales was a lawyer who was active in civil rights actions in South Texas. This book of recollections gives a personal insight into the conditions in Texas.

Cletus, Daniel. Chicano Workers and the Politics of Fairness: The FEPC in the Southwest, 1941–1945. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1991. A study of how this agency failed the expectations of Mexican Americans for justice in the workplace.

Driscoll, Bárbara A. Mexican Railroad Workers in the United States during World Wa r II/Me voy pa' Pensilvania por no andar en la vagancia: Los ferrocarrileros mexicanos en Estados Unidos durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Trans. Lauro Medina. 1st ed. Mexico City: Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes; Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Centro de Investigaciones sobre América del Norte, 1996. A study using Mexican oral histories and documents of the struggles of the Mexican bracero workers on the railroads during the war.

Garcia, Mario T. “Americans All: The Mexican American Generation and the Politics of Wartime Los Angeles, 1941–45.” Social Science Quarterly 65, no. 2 (1984): 278–289. An in-depth study of the Coordinating Council for Latin American Youth, headed by Manuel Ruiz Jr.

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