First Lady of the Confederacy: Varina Davis's Civil War

By Joan E. Cashin | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

NOW THAT THIS BOOK IS DONE, I am delighted to thank the many people who helped me along die way. The National Endowment for the Humanities furnished two grants from the Travel to Collections Program, and die Charles Warren Center at Harvard University and the Humanities Institute at the University of Virginia provided fellowships widi precious time to write.

Among the many dedicated archivists and curators I worked with, these individuals were especially helpful: Virginia Beatty of the Willard Memorial Library; Jonathan Coss of the AXA Archives; Gordon Cotton of the Old Court House Museum in Vicksburg; John Dougan at die Archives Department of Memphis Public Library; (“Catherine Hall of die Howell, New Jersey, Historical Society; Patrick Hotard of Beauvoir, The Jefferson Davis Home & Presidential Library; Patrick Kerwin of the Library of Congress; Sarah Millard of the Archives Section of the Bank of England; Mimi Miller of die Historic Natchez Foundation; Tommy O'Bierne of die Chancery Court in Natchez; and Robin Reed and Tucker Hill of the Museum of the Confederacy. Ed Frank of Special Collections at die University of Memphis allowed me to make an infrared image of a letter in the collections. John Coski and Ruthann Coski of the Museum of the Confederacy were most generous widi their expertise on the Davises and the Civil War era. Thoroughly modern in their outlook on history, diey extended every courtesy, and I very much appreciated their assistance.

These descendants of the Davis, Grant, Howell, and Tyler families kindly corresponded with me, provided copies of manuscripts, or granted permission to cite manuscripts: Genevieve Barksdale, Ulysses Grant Dietz, Jayne Eannarino, Davis Gaillard, Ellen Gilchrist, Bertram Hayes-Davis, Julia S. Mills,

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First Lady of the Confederacy: Varina Davis's Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Half Breed 9
  • 2: This Mr. Davis 31
  • 3: Flattered and Courted 54
  • 4: First Lady 80
  • 5: No Matter What Danger There Was 107
  • 6: Holocausts of Herself 128
  • 7: Run with the Rest 152
  • 8: Threadbare Great Folks 171
  • 9: Topic of the Day 190
  • 10: Crowd of Sorrows 209
  • 11: Fascinating Failures 227
  • 12: The Girdled Tree 245
  • 13: Delectable City 264
  • 14: Like Martha 283
  • 15: At Peace 306
  • Abbrevations 314
  • Notes 315
  • A Note on Sources 393
  • Acknowledgments 395
  • Index 397
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