Introduction to Jewish and Catholic Bioethics: A Comparative Analysis

By Aaron L. Mackler | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THE DEVELOPMENT OF THIS BOOK HAS BEEN A LENGTHY and rewarding process, during which I have enjoyed the assistance of many people. My thinking about many of the issues discussed in this book was enriched by my work a decade ago as staff ethicist for the New York State Task Force on Life and the Law. The core argument of this work was presented in a paper delivered at the College Theology Society Annual Convention in 1996. This later was published as “Jewish and Roman Catholic Approaches to Bioethics: Convergence and Divergence in Method and Substance” in Louvain Studies 25 (2000): 3–22. An earlier version of chapter 7 originally was published as “Jewish and Roman Catholic Approaches to Access to Health Care and Rationing” in Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (2001): 317–36. Significant material from chapter 2 is adapted from my introduction to Life and Death Responsibilities in Jewish Biomedical Ethics (New York: Jewish Theological Seminary of America, Finkelstein Institute, 2000), 1–14.

I am grateful for the support in developing this work provided by a summer stipend in 2000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities (no. FT-45174–00). I am thankful as well to Duquesne University for granting me a Presidential Scholarship stipend and for giving me a sabbatical leave that enabled me to devote extensive time to this project.

I have learned much from my colleagues and students at Duquesne University. I am particularly grateful to my colleagues in the Theology Department and in the graduate Health Care Ethics Program. Special thanks go to David F. Kelly, director of the Health Care Ethics Program, who has enriched my understanding of Roman Catholic bioethics and clinical health care ethics generally. He has offered crucial support from his original suggestion of the topic to reading the entire manuscript and offering valuable suggestions. Jim Hanigan,

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Introduction to Jewish and Catholic Bioethics: A Comparative Analysis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.