Introduction to Jewish and Catholic Bioethics: A Comparative Analysis

By Aaron L. Mackler | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
In Vitro Fertilization

BOTH JUDAISM AND ROMAN CATHOLICISM VALUE THE FAMILY and understand the full blessings of marriage to include children as well as loving companionship. For both traditions, marriage and sexual relations include unitive and procreative dimensions. Procreation normatively occurs within marriage, and—at least in the ideal case— conception arises from marital intercourse.

Complications arise when a married couple wishes to have children but is not able to do so. Infertility has been a concern throughout human history. The Bible reports that women such as Sarah, Rebecca, and Hannah suffered because of their infertility. Rachel cried to her husband Jacob, “Give me children, or I shall die.”1 About 7 percent of couples in the United States are infertile—unable to have children after one year or more of trying to do so. A variety of medical and technological interventions have been developed, which help many infertile couples to have a child.2 Religious thinkers have raised questions about which of these interventions are morally appropriate. For Jewish and Catholic writers alike, having children represents an area in which medicine must be practiced in a manner consistent with responsible and reverent stewardship. Differences arise with regard to how to specify and balance values such as human dignity, love of neighbor, compassion, healing, and a human stewardship that is both active and respectful of divine sovereignty.

One of the most dramatic interventions is in vitro fertilization (IVF). IVF involves fertilization of an ovum outside the body; “in vitro,” literally meaning “in glass,” refers to the laboratory equipment in which sperm and ova are combined. In the first successful use of IVF as a reproductive technology, British researchers Robert Edwards and Patrick Steptoe fertilized an ovum produced by Leslie

-156-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Introduction to Jewish and Catholic Bioethics: A Comparative Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Methodology in Roman Catholic Moral Theology 25
  • Chapter 2 - Methodology in Jewish Ethics 44
  • Chapter 3 - Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide 64
  • Chapter 4 - Treatment Decisions Near the End of Life 85
  • Chapter 5 - Abortion 120
  • Chapter 6 - In Vitro Fertilization 156
  • Chapter 7 - Access to Health Care and Rationing 190
  • Conclusion 212
  • Works Cited 239
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.