Interpreting the Prophets

By James Luther Mays; Paul J. Achtemeier | Go to book overview

12
Jeremiah in
the Lectionary

THOMAS M. RAITT

When texts from Jeremiah that appear in the lectionary passages are
read in conjunction with the accompanying New Testament texts,
Jeremiah functions anew as an interpreter of God's Word, providing
illumination unavailable to an interpretation of the passages taken by
themselves.

A quite different portrait of Jeremiah emerges from the aggregate of the Jeremiah passages in the lectionary than the one in the previous three essays in this book. The historical-literary critical legitimacy of this lectionary portrait is subordinated to the fact that when Christians worship they necessarily act out a Christian identity. That will inevitably lead to reading Jeremiah through the light of Christian experience and New Testament revelation.

When one tries to understand why lectionaries select from Jeremiah what they do, one must come to terms with the anomaly that lectionaries are not uch interested in prophetic writings in general. By far the most heavily used prophetic book in the lectionaries is Isaiah, and it sets the tone for the use of other prophetic material. This helps to explain why two of the lectionary selections of the eleven from Jeremiah, which have been almost universally judged as late additions by source critics (23:1-6; 33:14-16), are utilized. They are messianic predictions and thus expand on the Isaianic trend. Another passage, 31:7-9, also doubtful as stemming from Jeremiah himself, puts us in the optimistic era of deliverance after bondage in the Babylonian exile, like the latter parts of Isaiah.

Of the remaining Jeremiah lections, six deal not with his message but with his life. It is with these passages that we come to the heart of the Christian appropriation of Jeremiah into the life of the Christian believer and the early church. The four of these which are autobiographical, Jeremiah's so-called “laments,” are, at worst, sub-Christian expressions of vengeance, self-righteousness, and bitterness about the sacrifices involved in filling the prophetic vocation. At their best these four show that being a messenger of Gods word is a difficult calling and that often the last thing people want to hear is the

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Interpreting the Prophets
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 287

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.