Body Evidence: Intimate Violence against South Asian Women in America

By Shamita Das Dasgupta | Go to book overview

AUTHOR BIOGRAPHIES

RUKSANA AYYUB is a Pakistani American. She is a public speaker, published author on domestic violence, and a proud mother of two sons.

RUPALEEM BHUYAN is a second-generation immigrant of Assamese heritage. She is an assistant professor in social welfare at the University of Kansas.

PRAJNA PARAMITA CHOUDHURY is a Bangladeshi American woman working for the past decade to alleviate domestic violence, hate crime, sexual assault, and HIV/AIDS through education, advocacy, and counseling. She is an award-winning LGBT community activist in California and is a practitioner of traditional Chinese medicine.

ELORA HALIM CHOWDHURY is an assistant professor of women's studies at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Her fields of interest include critical development studies, Third World/transnational feminisms, and feminist ethnography.

SHAMITA DAS DASGUPTA is a psychologist, a cofounder of Manavi, and teaches at the New York University Law School. She is an adoring mother and grandmother.

MANDEEP GREWAL has extensively researched the connections between effective policy making and the communication patterns of marginalized populations. Her other research interests include examining the mass mediated dimension of gender roles and the significance of different communication channels in the lives of immigrant Indian women in the United States.

SANDEEP HUNJAN is a clinical psychologist in Ontario. Her research interests are in the area of gender, trauma, and culture, with an emphasis on South Asian contexts.

SHASHI JAIN is a New Jersey and New York licensed psychologist and works for the Department of Human Services. She is a cofounder of Manavi and actively volunteers her services for battered women.

SUJATHA ANBUSELVI JESUDASON is a doctoral candidate and has worked as an organizer and advocate in communities of color and on women's liberation issues.

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