Introducing Psychology through Research

By Amanda Albon | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Foremost, I would like to thank Open University Press, especially Laura Dent, Shona Mullen and Ruben Hale for their help and advice. Thanks also to Nick for reading many drafts, to the anonymous reviewers who provided helpful comments and criticisms, and to Elizabeth Haylett at the Society of Authors.

Thanks are also due to two groups of students who inspired me to write this book. I taught the first group for a University of Kent programme at Canterbury Adult Education Centre from 2004 to 2005. They had no previous knowledge of psychology and many initially held misconceptions about what psychology was. To their credit, they stuck with my course! The second were a group studying with the Open University. They reminded me that the leap from using text books to using journal research papers can be very daunting.


Copyright acknowledgements

I am grateful for permission to reprint the following material:

Chapter 3: Searching for threat, The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, (2002), by kind permission of the Experimental Psychology Society, 2006.

Chapter 4: Reprinted from the Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behaviour, 13, Loftus, E.F. and Palmer, J.C., Reconstruction of automobile destruction: an example of the interaction between language and memory, 585–9, (1974), with permission from Elsevier.

Chapter 5: European Journal of Social Psychology, Fischer, P., Greitemeyer, T., Pollozek, F. and Frey, D. (2006). The unresponsive bystander: are bystanders more responsive in dangerous emergencies?, reproduced by permission of John Wiley and Sons Limited.

Chapter 6: Bokhorst, C.L., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Fearon, R.M.P., Van Ijzendoorn, M.H., Fonagy, P. and Schuengel, C. (2003). The importance of shared environment in mother-infant attachment security: a behavioural genetic study. Child Development, 74: 1769–82, by kind permission of Blackwell Publishing.

Chapter 7: Reprinted from Intelligence, 33, McDaniel, M. Big-brained people are smarter: a meta-analysis of the relationship between in vivo brain volume and intelligence, 337–46, (2005), with permission from Elsevier.

-xi-

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Introducing Psychology through Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Boxes and Tables ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - Introducing Psychology 3
  • 1: Introducing Psychology 5
  • 2: The Method behind the Psychology 16
  • 3: How Psychological Research Is Reported 29
  • Part 2 - The Core Areas and Research Papers 43
  • 4: Cognitive Psychology 45
  • 5: Social Psychology 56
  • 6: Developmental Psychology 70
  • 7: Biological Psychology 88
  • 8: Individual Differences 100
  • 9: Clinical Psychology 117
  • Part 3 - Reviewing Psychology 135
  • 10: The Ethics of Psychology Research 137
  • 11: Conclusion 150
  • Glossary 161
  • References 169
  • Index 179
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