Church and State: Lutheran Perspectives

By John R. Stumme; Robert W. Tuttle | Go to book overview

2
Toward a Lutheran “Delight in the Law
of the Lord”: Church and State
in the Context of Civil Society

Gary M. Simpson

Blessed are those who do not follow the advice of the wicked,
or take the path that sinners tread,
or sit in the seat of scoffers;
but their delight is in the law of the Lord,
and on that law they meditate day and night.

—Psalm 1:1–2

God has endowed the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and its predecessor bodies with a half-century of trustworthy theological reflection on our topic. This chapter builds on that endowment. The ELCA Constitution attempts to encapsulate this heritage in its “Statement of Purpose.” Among the many ways to participate in the triune God's mission, the ELCA commits itself to “[w]ork with civil authorities in areas of mutual endeavor, maintaining institutional separation of church and state in a relation of functional interaction.”1 This formulation provides the imaginative horizon for my investigation.

At the beginning of the third millennium, Lutherans in the United States can harvest their heritage in order to face newer challenges, like the emerging shifts in the nation-state and the renewed appreciation for the public sphere of civil society. In the first section, “Our Originating Confessions,” I outline the contours of Lutheran confessional reflections on the neuralgic theme of God and political authority as one contribution toward a Lutheran “delight in the law of the Lord.”2 These confessional contours appear succinctly in Article 16 of the Augsburg Confession. The vehicle that effectively hands these confessional convictions on from generation to generation is Martin Luther's Small

-20-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Church and State: Lutheran Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contributors viii
  • Preface ix
  • Part I - The Tradition Revisited 1
  • 1: The Confessional Basis of Lutheran Thinking on Church-State Issues 3
  • 2: Toward a Lutheran “delight in the Law of the Lord” 20
  • 3: A Lutheran Tradition on Church and State 51
  • 4: Promoting the General Welfare 74
  • Part II - The Legal Contexts of Church-State Interaction 93
  • 5: Religious Liberty 95
  • 6: We Must Spare No Diligence 119
  • 7: Love Thy Neighbor 140
  • Index of Cases 208
  • Index of Names and Subjects 210
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 219

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.