The Fat Studies Reader

By Esther Rothblum; Sondra Solovay | Go to book overview

18
Fat Women as “Easy Targets”
Achieving Masculinity Through Hogging

Ariane Prohaska and Jeannine Gailey

“Hogging” is a practice in which men prey on women they deem fat or unattractive to satisfy sexual desires or compete with their peers. Hoggers, a self-imposed label, are groups of men who hang out at bars or parties and try to pick up fat women for sex or make bets with their friends about who can pick up the fattest or most unattractive woman (Gailey & Prohaska, 2006). The bets range from simply getting a phone number or dance to receiving some form of sexual gratification from the woman.

Hogging, as a scholarly topic, has largely been ignored until recently (Gailey & Prohaska, 2006), but has gained some attention in the news media. Self-proclaimed hoggers were interviewed for Scene Magazine, a local entertainment magazine in Cleveland, Ohio (Fenske, 2003). The men interviewed for the Scene Magazine article refer to women they pick up as “hogs” or “slump-busters” (Fenske 2003, p. 15), a phrase used by baseball player Mark Grace on the Jim Rome Show and by baseball player Jose Canseco in his 2005 autobiography, Juiced (Dowd, 2005). When one is looking for a slumpbuster, a hog, or “road beef” (as Canseco puts it), he seeks out, as Grace mentioned, the “fattest gnarliest chick you can uncover” in order to try to break out of a slump (Dowd, 2005, p. 99). The implication of Grace's quote is that fat women are sexually easy and can help men out of a losing streak, either on the field or in the bedroom.

The present chapter focuses on how hogging is used as a tool whereby men create and maintain masculinity. The sociology of masculinities is a burgeoning field in the sociology of gender (see, e.g., Brannon, 1976; Connell, 1987; Kaufmann, 1994; Kimmel, 1998; 2006). Kimmel (2006) argues that there are multiple masculinities, with the dominant, hegemonic masculinity being the most rewarded in contemporary society. Men reward one another with power and prestige if they adhere to the hegemonic masculine ideal.

Robert Brannon (1976) discussed four aspects of the male gender role: (1) “No Sissy Stuff” (antifemininity); (2) “Be a Sturdy Oak” (inexpressiveness and independence); (3) “Give 'em Hell” (adventurousness and aggression); and (4) “Be a Big Wheel” (status and achievement). Men adhere to the masculine ideal in different ways: participating in sports, drinking heavily, or pursuing women for sexual purposes. One extreme way that men may attempt to adhere to normative masculinity is

-158-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Fat Studies Reader
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 365

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.