The Fat Studies Reader

By Esther Rothblum; Sondra Solovay | Go to book overview

LUCY APHRAMOR, BSc. Hons., RD, is a dietitian with a HAES-promoting cardiac rehabilitation team and holds a research post at Coventry University, United Kingdom.

D. LACY ASBILL received an MA in Human Sexuality Studies from San Francisco State University. She is the founding director of Girls Moving Forward, an education and empowerment service dedicated to ending the pervasive gender confidence gap in education.

DEREK ATTIG graduated from Beloit College in 2006 with majors in History and Women's Studies. Derek is now a PhD student in the Department of History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

S. BEAR BERGMAN (http://www.sbearbergman.com) is an author, a theater artist, and an instigator, as well as the author of Butch Is a Noun (Suspect Thoughts Press, 2006) and three award-winning solo performances.

BETH BERNSTEIN, MA, MFT, is a therapist in Oakland, California, and past host of the radio talk show Body Language: The Show About How You Relate to Your Body. Her writing has appeared in Bitch, Bust, the Health at Every Size Journal, and the anthology Bitchfest: 10 Years of Bitch Magazine.

NATALIE BOERO, PhD, is on the sociology faculty at San Jose State University as an Assistant Professor, specializing in medical sociology, feminist theory, sociology of the body, and qualitative research methods.

DEB BURGARD, PhD, is a clinical psychologist, creator of the BodyPositive.com and ShowMeTheData (http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/ShowMeTheData/) websites, coauthor of Great Shape: The First Fitness Guide for Large Women, and columnist for the Health at Every Size Journal. She does research on the ways that everyday people across the weight spectrum integrate sustainable, self-nurturing practices into their lives.

WENDY A. BURNS-ARDOLINO, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Liberal Studies at Clayton State University, where she directs the Women's Studies Program and the Master of Arts Program in Liberal Studies. Her publications focus on feminist theory,

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