Emotions in the Field: The Psychology and Anthropology of Fieldwork Experience

By James Davies; Dimitrina Spencer | Go to book overview
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Contributors

Joanna Cook is George Kingsley Roth Research Fellow in Southeast Asian Studies at Christ's College, University of Cambridge. Her Ph.D. research explored vipassanā meditation in Thailand as a monastic practice. Her current research focuses on the use of Buddhist meditation techniques in medical and healthcare practices in Thailand. Her forthcoming monograph is titled Meditation in Modern Buddhism: Renunciation and Change in Thai Monastic Life.

Vincent Crapanzano is Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature and Anthropology at the Graduate Centre of the City University of New York. His publications include The Hamadsha: A Study in Ethnopsychiatry (1981), Tuhami: A Portrait of a Moroccan (1985), Waiting: The Whites of South Africa (1986), Hermes' Dilemma and Hamlet's Desire: On the Epistemology of Interpretation (1992), and Imaginative Horizons: An Essay in Literary Philosophical Anthropology (2003). At present, he is finishing a book on the Hakris.

James Davies, coeditor of this volume, is a member of St. Cross College at the University of Oxford, where he obtained his doctorate in social anthropology. He is also a qualified and practicing psychotherapist working in the NHS at Oxford and a senior lecturer in anthropology and psychotherapy in the School of Human and Life Sciences at Roehampton University, London. He has undertaken fieldwork in Nepal, where he studied Tibetan monastic communities. He is the author of The Making of Psychotherapists: An Anthropological Analysis (2009).

Ghassan Hage is a Fellow of the Australian Humanities Association and the University of Melbourne's Future Generation Professor of Anthropology and

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