Makers of Ancient Strategy: From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome

By Victor Davis Hanson | Go to book overview

Contributors

Victor Davis Hanson is the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow in Residence in Classics and Military History at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and emeritus professor of Classics at California State University, Fresno. He is also the Wayne & Marcia Buske Distinguished Fellow in History, Hillsdale College, where he teaches courses in military history and classical culture. He is the author of many books, including A War Like No Other: How the Athenians and Spartans Fought the Peloponnesian War (Random House, 2005); Carnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power (Doubleday, 2001); The Soul of Battle: From Ancient Times to the Pres- ent Day, How Three Great Liberators Vanquished Tyranny (Free Press, 1999); Hoplites: The Classical Greek Battle Experience (Routledge, 1993); The Western Way of War: Infantry Battle in Classical Greece (Knopf, 1989); Other Greeks: The Family Farm and the Agrarian Roots of Western Civilization (Free Press, 1995); and Warfare and Agriculture in Classical Greece (University of California Press, 1983).

David L. Berkey is assistant professor in the Department of History at California State University, Fresno. He received his doctorate in Classics and ancient history in 2001 from Yale University and his bachelor's degree from Johns Hopkins University in international studies in 1989.

Adrian Goldsworthy was educated at St. John's College, Oxford, and is currently Visiting Fellow at Newcastle University. His doctoral thesis was published in the Oxford monographs series under the title The Roman Army at War, 100 BC–ad 200. He was a Junior Research Fellow at Cardiff University and subsequently an assistant professor in the University of Notre Dame's London program. He now writes full time. His most recent books include Caesar: The Life of a Colossus

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