Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities

By Martha C. Nussbaum | Go to book overview

INDEX
accountability, moral, 42, 43, 54
Alcott, Bronson, 1, 6, 18, 60–62, 72, 102, 141
Alcott, Louisa May, 61, 118; Little Men, 102
Andhra Pradesh, India, 15, 20
animality, of human beings, 31–33
Antioch College, 63–64
anxiety, 31–32, 34, 110
arts: abilities associated with, 7; case study in, 112–17; costs of, 117, 119–20; and democracy, 107–8, 116; economic growth aided by, 10, 112; educational significance of, 102–12, 118–20; elimination of, from curricula, 2, 23–24, 113; and empathy, 101; and human development, 101–2; and imagination, 24; misuse of, 109; non-ideological nature of, 23–24, 146n8; play and, 101; pleasure derived from, 110; sympathy cultivated through, 7, 96, 106–9, 123; in Tagore's educational model, 103–6, 110–11, 139; value of, 7, 143. See also liberal arts education
Asch, Solomon, 41, 51, 54
assessment. See testing
Athenian democracy, 48–49
authority: deference to, 40–42, 48, 50, 53–54; Socratic argument not reliant on, 50–51
Batson, C. Daniel, 36–37
Bentley College, 55
binary thinking, 28–29, 35–36, 38
BJP (political party), 21–22
blaming the victim, 38
blind spots, cultural, 106–8
body: dance and, 104–5; disgust directed at, 32–33, 35; singing and, 115; as source of weakness and helplessness, 30–31, 35; women and, 104–5
Britain: assessment in, 135; threat to humanities in, 127–30, 132–33
Browning, Christopher, 41
Buddhism, 83
Chicago Children's Choir, 112–17
children: active educational participation of, 18, 58–61, 87; moral development of, 30–40, 96–99; sympathy as capacity of, 96
children's stories: development of concern for others through, 99; and morality, 35–36, 147n8; of world's cultures, 83 China, 15
citizenship: education for, 7, 9, 66–67, 80–94, 133; Socratic values embodied in, 72. See also world citizenship
clash of civilizations, 28–30, 143
“clash within,” 29–30, 35–36, 143
Cleon, 50
colleges. See higher education
Collini, Stefan, 130
Columbia University, 136
compassion, 30, 36–38
competence, individual development and, 34, 40, 97
Comte, Auguste, 69
constitutions, U.S. and Indian, 13, 16, 25
control, desire for, 30–31, 34–35, 37, 39, 44, 97, 109. See also domination; helplessness; weakness and vulnerability

-153-

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Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • I: The Silent Crisis 1
  • II: Education for Profit, Education for Democracy 13
  • III: Educating Citizens 27
  • IV: Socratic Pedagogy 47
  • V: Citizens of the World 79
  • VI: Cultivating Imagination 95
  • VII: Democratic Education on the Ropes 121
  • Notes 145
  • Index 153
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