From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain

By Susan D. Pennybacker | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

AROCKEFELLER FOUNDATION HUMANIST-IN-RESIDENCE Arturo Schomburg Fellowship at the City College of New York and a subsequent award from CCNY's Simon Rifkind Center for the Humanities, made it possible for me to begin this book in the New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture over the course of two years in the early 1990s. Diana Latchatanere and Andre Elizee kindly connected me with Marika Sherwood in London, the first of many sorts of help that they offered. Sherwood led me to the archival consultant and translator Liudmilla Selivanova, and with the assistance of the Rockefeller award, I made the first two trips of three to Moscow, in 1994 and 1996. Selivanova's grasp of the evolving project and her comprehensive knowledge of the Comintern archives proved indispensable, as they have for others who followed.

The Notes on Sources and Bibliography attest to my use of many other collections and materials. I thank the personnel of the Russian, American, British, Dutch, and French research institutions noted in these sections, and especially the following persons, institutions, and organizations for all nature of archival and library assistance: Oleg Naumov and Kirill Anderson of the Russian State Archive for Social-Political History in Moscow; the Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division of the New York Public Library and the Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations, for permission to cite the Ralph Bunche Papers, the International Labor Defense Records and the Richard B. Moore Papers at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture; Dr. Joyce Turner for permission to cite the papers of Richard B. Moore; Marcel van der Linden and the staff of the International Institute for Social History in Amsterdam; Jeffrey M. Flannery, John Michael Haynes, Beverly Brennan, David J. Kelly, Judith Robinson, and Elgin Reid of the Library of Congress, the longest home of this project; the family of Naomi Mitchison and the Trustees of the National Library of Scotland for permission to cite Mitchison's papers at the Library, where I was assisted by Sheila Mackenzie and Robin Smith; Lisa Dowdeswell and The Society of Authors in London, on behalf of the Bernard Shaw Estate, for permission to cite letters of George Bernard Shaw; Elizabeth Wells of the Churchill Archive Center, Churchill College, Cambridge; Kate E. Boyce of Hull University Archives; Maureen Waltry of the Sydney Jones Library of the University of Liverpool, for permission to cite the papers of Eleanor Rathbone; Jeff Howarth of Anti-Slavery International for permission to cite the papers of Lady Simon within the Anti-Slavery Society collection at Rhodes House, Oxford; the Department of Special Collections of the Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA, for permission to quote the Ralph Bunche Diary, and Lilace Hatayama and Genie

-ix-

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From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Ada Wright and Scottsboro 16
  • Chapter 2 - George Padmore and London 66
  • Chapter 3 - Lady Kathleen Simon and Antislavery 103
  • Chapter 4 - Saklatvala and the Meerut Trial 146
  • Chapter 5 - Diasporas: Refugees and Exiles 200
  • Chapter 6 - A Thieves' Kitchen, 1938–39 240
  • Conclusion 265
  • Chronology 275
  • Notes on Sources 279
  • Notes 283
  • Glossary 341
  • Bibliography 353
  • Index 371
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