From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain

By Susan D. Pennybacker | Go to book overview

Chapter 6
A THIEVES' KITCHEN, 1938–39

Towards all peoples of whatever race the British have built up a characteristic atti-
tude of cultivated aloofness, but most Britons, irrespective of social status, display
an added aversion to peoples of darker skin. It is this racial egotism and national
arrogance which has created a conflict between the British and colored peoples of
the Empire.… Few Negroes, in England, I imagine, have not passed through the
bitter experience of looking for apartments and being told constantly, “We do not
take colored people.” In five weeks of flat-hunting the writer learned to find his
way competently about London.
George Padmore, The Crisis, 1938

I haven't much to say about Negroes. I know that the popular conception of them
as a lazy, throat-cutting, fried chicken eating race is wrong but I do think that they
are different from the white races—less civilized if you like. I suppose the Tropics
are not the place to look for a Leonardo, an Einstein or a Farraday—but I don't
think that means they are intellectually inferior. The policy of the white races has
always been to exploit the negro, but now that they are getting some measure of
Freedom and the benefits of Western culture, they are proving that though they
may be backward, there is no reason, given good conditions, why they shouldn't
play a very important part in the world.

Mass Observer, housewife, age thirty-nine, near Olney, Yorkshire, 1939

IN NOVEMBER 1937 the fearless Padmore purportedly returned to Nazi Germany. The Chicago Defender published his remarkable, if unverified report from Hamburg:

Four years ago I was arrested by the Nazis and deported from Germany for criticiz-
ing Hitler's treatment of Negroes from the former German African colonies.… I
have recently made a tour through Germany from Holland to Sweden, during which
I have had the opportunity to meet and speak with many Jewish leaders and to dis-
cuss the “Jewish” problem. For obvious reasons, I shall not mention names, but I am
able to say that the position of the Jews under the Nazi regime is as bad as the condi-
tions of the Negroes in the Southern States of America and South Africa.

He described the use of “drastic anti-Semitic methods of terrorism" and the dispatch of fascists to America and South Africa in order to study the methods applied toward blacks in each region, since the Nazis considered Jews to be the

-240-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Ada Wright and Scottsboro 16
  • Chapter 2 - George Padmore and London 66
  • Chapter 3 - Lady Kathleen Simon and Antislavery 103
  • Chapter 4 - Saklatvala and the Meerut Trial 146
  • Chapter 5 - Diasporas: Refugees and Exiles 200
  • Chapter 6 - A Thieves' Kitchen, 1938–39 240
  • Conclusion 265
  • Chronology 275
  • Notes on Sources 279
  • Notes 283
  • Glossary 341
  • Bibliography 353
  • Index 371
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 382

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.