From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain

By Susan D. Pennybacker | Go to book overview

INDEX
Page numbers in italics refer to illustrations.
abdication crisis (1936), 341
Abercrombie, Lascelles, 46–47, 59, 213, 259
Abrahams, Peter, 80, 262
Abyssinia: exiles/refugees from, 139, 143; Italian aggression toward, 8, 64, 81, 87–88, 91, 126–33, 135–45, 276, 341; slavery in, 8, 107, 110, 114, 129–32
ACE (Committee of Experts on Slavery), 119
Adams, Vyvyan, 141
Addams, Jane, 209
Adhikari, G. M., 164, 164–65, 171, 190
Advisory Committee on Imperial Questions (Labour Party), 148
Advisory Committee on International Questions (Labour Party), 139, 246
Afghanistan, 150
African Welfare Committee, 138
Ahmad, Muzaffar, 164, 171
Aliens Order (1920), 134–35
Allen, Elizabeth Acland, 229
All-India Trades Union Congress, 149, 174
Allison, George, 150, 156, 173, 222
Alwe, A. A., 165
American National Committee to Aid the Victims of German Fascism, 201
Amery Leo, 96–97, 144, 245
Ames, Jesse, 125–26
Anders, Guenther, 234
Anderson, Ivy, 18
Andre, Edgar, 88
Angell, Norman, 132, 222
anti-colonialism/imperialism, 11, 13, 82, 9698, 148–49, 187, 266–67, 270–71
antifascism, 13, 50, 57, 59, 127, 187, 201, 21315, 222, 249, 270–71
Anti-Slavery and Aborigines' Protection Society, 3, 103–5, 108–10, 113, 117–19, 129–31, 137, 142–44, 341
antislavery movement, 8, 103–10, 133, 341; Abyssinian crisis and, 129–31, 137; Scottsboro case and, 62, 104, 114–15, 117–18, 133; Wilberforce centenary and, 118–26, 276
Anti-War Congress (1932), 38, 75, 221, 276, 341
Aragon, Louis, 84
Aschberg, Olaf 230
Astor, Nancy Astor, Viscountess, 198, 231
Atholl, Katharine Stewart-Murray Duchess of, 231,233,258
Attlee, Clement, 158, 190, 192
Auden, W. H., 200
Authors Take Sides (Spanish Civil War), 97
Azikiwe, Benjamin Nnamdi, 53, 67
Baker, Zita, 55–56
Bakker-Nort, Betsy, 211
Baldwin, Roger N, 43–44, 234, 275
Baldwin, Stanley, 129, 174, 342
Balfour Declaration, 142
Ballard, Arthur, 98
Bandung Conference (1955), 262, 273, 345
Banerjee, S., 164
Barbour James, John Alexander, 32
Barbusse, Henri, 45, 208–9, 275, 300n35
Barclay, Edwin, 131
Barnes, Leonard, 8, 88, 129, 244, 246, 260
Barney, Dolores Elvira, 20, 36
Baron, Rose, 60
Barth, Karl, 236
Bartlett, Vernon, 205, 233, 247
Basak, Gopal, 164
Bates, Ruby, 20, 22–23, 31, 37, 42–43, 47, 135
Beer, Max, 231–32
Bell, Julian, 259
Bellenger, Frederick, 141
Bengal Criminal Amendment Act (1929), 172
Bengal Ordinance (1925), 150
Benn, Wedgwood, 167, 175
Bentwich, Norman, 129
Berghahn, Marian, 218
Berlin Penal Conference, 190–91
Bernhard, Georg, 223
Bevan, Aneurin, 216–17, 276, 294nl68
Bevin, Ernest, 213
Bhatt, K. S., 192
Bilé, Josef, 74, 177
Bishop, Reginald, 192
Bismarck, Otto von, 119

-371-

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From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Ada Wright and Scottsboro 16
  • Chapter 2 - George Padmore and London 66
  • Chapter 3 - Lady Kathleen Simon and Antislavery 103
  • Chapter 4 - Saklatvala and the Meerut Trial 146
  • Chapter 5 - Diasporas: Refugees and Exiles 200
  • Chapter 6 - A Thieves' Kitchen, 1938–39 240
  • Conclusion 265
  • Chronology 275
  • Notes on Sources 279
  • Notes 283
  • Glossary 341
  • Bibliography 353
  • Index 371
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