The Church and Secularity: Two Stories of Liberal Society

By Robert Gascoigne | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

It is a great pleasure to record my thanks to those who have assisted me in the development of this book. The book includes some previously published material, and I would like to thank the respective editors and publishers for their permission to republish this material. The articles and chapters gave me a valuable opportunity to develop the ideas presented in this book, and I am grateful for the various invitations and occasions that gave rise to them.

My particular thanks and appreciation go to Jim Keenan, editor of the Moral Traditions series, and Richard Brown, director of Georgetown University Press, for their encouragement of this project and their acceptance of this book in the series. I would like to thank all the staff of Georgetown University Press for their courteous and timely help.

I am very grateful to James McEvoy for his advice and encouragement during the writing of this book, as well as to Raymond Canning for his assistance with some aspects of Augustine scholarship. Any errors that remain are naturally my own.

Two conferences convened by Nigel Biggar, on “Religious Voices in Public Places” and “The Christian Foundations of Liberal Society,” were very stimulating and instructive in the field of ideas that this book is concerned with.

I would like to record my thanks to the Australian Catholic University for the periods of study leave and teaching release that have made this book possible. Patrick McArdle and Gail Crossley, my head of department and dean at the time, gave me invaluable support in obtaining this leave.

The attempt to live as a Christian in a liberal society brings many challenges, joys, and surprises. I would like to thank my wife, Yvonne, for her companionship on this journey and all that it has meant in our

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