Art Rules: Pierre Bourdieu and the Visual Arts

By Michael Grenfell; Cheryl Hardy | Go to book overview

I
Introduction

In 1992 the French social theorist Pierre Bourdieu published Les Regles de l'art later translated as The Rules of Art (1996a). It is from this book that we have borrowed the title of our own book Art Rules. In it, we take Bourdieu's ideas and theories, both derived from studies of art and culture, and from other social topics such as education, economics, philosophy and politics, and apply them to a range of art fields. It is comparatively rare to have topics such as painting, photography and museums discussed almost entirely in terms of the ideas of one person. So why do it?

First, the work of Bourdieu is now attracting considerable attention in a range of disciplines in the social sciences and cultural studies. This interest can be seen as the culmination of more than forty years' work as a researcher since his first publications in the 1950s. His death in 2002 seems to have done nothing to lessen the enthusiasm of researchers and scholars in diverse academic fields to understand and apply his thinking to their own work. There is clearly a sense that approaching various topics and problems from a Bourdieusian perspective offers insights which are not readily available through conventional approaches. Such areas as language, media studies, sport, fashion, poetry, painting and literature, as well as culture and art, have all drawn on Bourdieu's work (directly and indirectly) in developing and elucidating a number of strands hitherto underrepresented by established methods.

The Rules of Art was published rather late in Bourdieu's career, for much of which he was best known internationally as a 'sociologist'. His major topics of study were Algeria, where he undertook military service in the 1950s, and education. Indeed, it is probably still as a sociologist of education that he is most well known, and he was a seminal figure in the renaissance of that discipline from the early 1970s. Works such as Les Héritiers (1964) and La Reproduction (1970) offered an entirely new perspective on the principles and outcomes of contemporary education for those who passed through it. These works culminated with major publications on Bourdieu's own academic world- Homo Academicus (1984) - and the elite training school in France, La Noblesse d'état (1989). It was not by chance that Bourdieu targeted education for his studies. In a climate of post-war renewal, education was seen as a principal means by which the new world would be built, and so it proved in many respects. In these works, Bourdieu offers a kind of social anthropology of the French education system, employing a range of

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Art Rules: Pierre Bourdieu and the Visual Arts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.