Open Fire: Understanding Global Gun Cultures

By Charles Fruehling Springwood | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Warriors and Guns: The Anthropology of Cattle
Rustling in Northeastern Africa

Nene Mburu

The justification for the study of asymmetrical conflicts cannot be overstated, considering that they occur daily amongst pastoral peoples, they are not anchored to a specific military doctrine, they have no frontlines, the shape and size of the warring parties cannot easily be determined, and, although weapons of mass destruction are not used, casualties from single attacks are often higher than in some inter-state wars. Even so, for a serious study of human society, the escalation, or the attritional nature of a given form of conflict is a criterion inadequate for the justifying of scholarly analysis. Furthermore, as pastoral conflicts in general and livestock rustlings in particular fall under the internal security framework of the state, institutions outside the local African knowledge situation have a limited awareness of their existence and their devastating impact on the societies in which they occur; and hence the international capacity to regulate them is circumscribed.

It is important to acknowledge that my contribution's lack of statistical details for the current casualty rates, patterns of incidence, and constancy of raids for all the pastoral peoples of Africa inhibits any generalization of theories of limited warfare that could put the phenomenon of raiding into a more comprehensive theoretical framework. Although livestock rustlings and bandit skirmishes with security forces are often trivialized as incidents in military field reports and security intelligence summaries that are still not in the public domain, this study obtained first-hand information by cluster-sampling informants from a wide geographical area, mostly on an ad hoc basis, and triangulating their oral evidence with that of informed independent sources. The study defines the problem in the light of existing studies on pastoral conflicts, and then explores the anthropological and physical context of livestock rustling and predatory expansion among the Turkana, Pokot and Toposa of northeastern Africa. The degree of explicit conceptualization involved is therefore limited, as the evidence is mainly obtained from fieldwork, archival, and newspaper sources, which therefore lend themselves to an account that is more descriptive than analytical.

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Open Fire: Understanding Global Gun Cultures
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.