The Laws of Armed Conflicts: A Collection of Conventions, Resolutions, and Other Documents

By Dietrich Schindler; Jiri Toman | Go to book overview

No. 64
THE PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE
PRINCIPLE OF NON-INTERVENTION IN
INTERNAL AFFAIRS OF STATES

Resolution adopted by the Institute of International Law at its Santiago de Compostela session, on 13 September 1989

INTRODUCTORY NOTE: In several respects, the present resolution is of direct concern to the laws of armed conflicts. First, the “frequent gross violations of human rights” to which the resolution refers (see preamble, paragraph 4) often also constitute violations of the laws of armed conflict. Second, Article 1, paragraph 2, calls upon states to ensure the effective protection of human rights throughout the world in a similar way as Article 1, common to the Geneva Conventions of 1949, imposes a duty upon states to ensure respect for the Geneva Conventions. Activities to this end vis-à-vis other states cannot be considered an unlawful intervention in the internal affairs of these states (see also Article 5, paragraph 1). Finally, Article 5 directly touches humanitarian law by regulating the offer by a state, an international organization and the ICRC of food and medical supplies to a state in whose territory the life or health of the population is seriously threatened. The resolution was adopted by a vote of 32 in favour and 4 abstentions (Annuaire de l'Institut de Droit international, Vol. 63-II, 1990, pp. 338-345).

AUTHENTIC TEXT: French and English. The text below is reproduced from Annuaire de l'Institut de droit international, Vol. 63-11, 1990, pp. 338-345.

TEXT PUBLISHED IN: Annuaire de l'Institut de droit international, Vol. 63-11, 1990, pp. 338-345 (Engl., French); Institute of International Law, Table of Adopted Resolutions (1957-1991), Paris, Pedone, 1992, pp. 206-213 (Engl., French); Droit des conflits armés, pp. 953-955 (French).

The Institute of International Law,

Recalling its Declarations of New York (1929) on “International Human Rights” and of Lausanne (1947) on “The Fundamental Human Rights as a Basis for Restoring International Law” as well as its Resolutions of Oslo (1932) and Aix-en-Provence (1954) on “The Determination of the 'Reserved Domain' and its Effects”;

Considering,

That the protection of human rights as a guarantee of the physical and moral integrity and of the fundamental freedom of every person has been given expression in both the constitutional systems of States and in the international legal system, especially in the charters and constituent instruments of international organizations;

That the members of the United Nations have undertaken to ensure, in co-operation with the Organization, universal respect for and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms, and that the General Assembly, recognizing that a common understanding of these rights and freedoms is of the highest importance for the full realization of this undertaking, has adopted and proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on 10 December 1948;

-879-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Laws of Armed Conflicts: A Collection of Conventions, Resolutions, and Other Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1496

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.